All Posts

Posted in Asia, Chiang Mai, English, Phuket, Thailand

Thailand – Day 7

РУССКОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ. CLICK HERE FOR RUSSIAN VERSION.

24 March 2018

This post is also supposed to turn out short, as well as devoid of any particular enthusiasm. But anyway, the morning started pretty well. We got up, had a slow breakfast at the poolside (by the way, the breakfast in Chiang Mai is leading so far, compared to breakfasts in other cities: there’s more variety, the food is tastier and the place looks more pleasant overall), and went for a walk to the Old Town on our own.

IMG_20180323_163025_290

Basically, just as during our evening walk with the guide, we didn’t discover anything particularly remarkable in the Old Town. Well, there is a medieval city wall, but I’ve seen better walls. Otherwise, there are lots and lots of temples at literally every step – I think, Chiang Mai has around 300 of them, in fact, that is what it’s famous for.

IMG_3662

IMG_3665

IMG_3666

IMG_3687

IMG_3683

On the way we noticed an interesting procession. First we saw school-aged boys in identical white clothes. They were followed by girls, in the same type of clothes, only with skirts. Then we saw young monks of the same age in monastic robes of the same white colour. There were also occasional adults, dressed normally, but all carrying beautifully folded orange cloth in their hands – it looked as if they were carrying robes for monks as a gift. Some schoolchildren were carrying some flags or portraits of the king and members of the royal family. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to figure out what kind of event that was and where they were all heading.

IMG_3670

IMG_3672

IMG_3673

IMG_3676

We didn’t get to do a long walk, as it became very hot, so we returned to the hotel, packed and came downstairs to the lobby to wait for our driver for our airport transfer. Kudos to the driver, he arrived exactly on time – it’s not for nothing that we liked him (moreover, in the driver-guide tandem, he was definitely our favourite).

The flight to Phuket itself was on time and went fine. But at the airport there was a surprise waiting for us – or rather, there wasn’t anyone waiting for us at all. Based on our experience working with this travel agency, this came completely unexpected, as neither in Vietnam, nor in Thailand so far had we faced such issues. We tried calling the agency, but no one responded – it was Saturday, after all. To our great luck, though, we had a business card from Vanna, our Bangkok guide. We called her, she followed up, and it turned out that there was someone waiting for us after all, but he didn’t have our names written on the paper, or maybe forgot about us completely. By the way, he wasn’t a personal guide, but merely a representative of the transfer company, and, having made us wait for some more time, finally organised a car with a driver for us. In total, we had to wait for at least 45 minutes. Honestly, it wasn’t the most pleasant experience, because while our Vietnam trip had left us with the impression that we were much better off taking a tour than if we’d organised the trip ourselves, in a situation like this we definitely felt that it would have been way easier for us to just get a taxi and not spend ages waiting.

As for tomorrow’s cooking class, no one left us any instructions either. Once again, many thanks to Vanna, who came to our rescue and found out everything: who would pick us up and when.

As a result, we arrived at the hotel already in the dark, and didn’t get to see much. The beach is right across our hotel, and there seem to be many different restaurants around. We wend to one of them straight away to have seafood and really enjoyed sitting on the terrace overlooking the sea (in the dark). The prices in Phuket are significantly higher than elsewhere and apparently, the restaurant itself wasn’t cheap as well. By the way, alcohol is relatively expensive throughout Thailand. A glass of wine or a cocktail here will cost the same as a main dish, if not more.

Advertisements
Posted in Азия, Пхукет, Русский, Таиланд, Чианг Май

Таиланд – День 7

CLICK HERE FOR ENGLISH VERSION. АНГЛОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ.

24 марта 2018

Этот пост тоже должен получиться коротким, а также лишенным особого восторга. Впрочем, с утра все было нормально. Мы встали, неспешно позавтракали у бассейна (кстати, завтрак в Чианг Мае пока лидирует по сравнению с другими городами: выбора больше, еда вкуснее и место приятнее), и пошли своим ходом на прогулку к Старому городу.

IMG_20180323_163025_290

В принципе, как и вечером с гидом, мы ничего особо примечательного в старом городе не обнаружили. Есть средневековая городская стена, но видала я стены и получше. Разве что, очень много храмов на каждом шагу – вообще, в Чианг Мае их около 300, он по сути этим и знаменит.

IMG_3662

IMG_3665

IMG_3666

IMG_3687

IMG_3683

По дороге мы заметили какое-то интересное шествие. Шли мальчики школьного возраста в одинаковой белой одежде. Потом шли девочки, в такой же одежде, только с юбками. Шли юные монахи такого же возраста в монашеских одеждах такого же белого цвета. Между ними попадались и взрослые, одетые обычно, но с красиво перевязанной оранжевой тканью в руках – выглядело это как будто они несли одеяния для монахов в подарок. Некоторые школьники несли какие-то флаги, либо портреты короля и членов королевской семьи. Что это было за мероприятие и куда они шли, нам узнать так и не удалось.

IMG_3670

IMG_3672

IMG_3673

IMG_3676

Долго гулять не получилось, так как стало очень жарко, и мы вернулись в отель, собрались и вышли ждать нашего шофера для трансфера в аэропорт. Шофер молодец, приехал тютелька в тютельку, недаром он нам понравился (причем, в связке шофер-гид, однозначно больше).

Сам полет прошел нормально и вовремя. А вот в аэропорту нас ждал сюрприз – вернее, не ждал никто. Мы, по нашему опыту работы с этой турфирмой, такого вообще не ожидали, так как ни во Вьетнаме, ни до сих пор в Таиланде таких накладок не возникало. Попытались было позвонить по номеру агентства, но там никто не брал: суббота все-таки. К большой удаче, у нас была визитка с номером Ванны, нашего гида в Бангкоке. Мы позвонили ей, она стала разбираться и оказалось, что какой-то гид нас все-таки ждет, только он не написал наших имен почему-то, может, забыл вообще про нас. Гид этот, кстати, был не персональный, а представитель трансферной компании, который, заставив нас прождать еще какое-то время, организовал машину с шофером. В общей сложности, нам пришлось прождать не меньше 45 минут. Честно говоря, инцидент не очень приятный, потому что если после Вьетнама у нас было впечатление, что от тура мы получили очень много, гораздо больше, чем если б организовывали поездку сами, то в такой ситуации как эта, нам реально было бы удобнее самим уехать на такси и не ждать так долго.

По поводу завтрашнего кулинарного класса нам тоже никто не сообщил, кто и когда за нами приедет, и спасибо Ванне, она опять пришла на помощь: позвонила и все узнала.

В результате в отель мы приехали уже затемно, и поэтому ничего особо не разглядели. Пляж у нас напротив, вокруг разные ресторанчики. В один из них мы сразу пошли на ужин есть морепродукты, и очень приятно посидели на террасе с видом на море (в темноте). Цены, правда, в Пхукете значительно выше, да и ресторан, судя по всему, не из дешевых. Кстати, алкоголь относительно дорог по всему Таиланду. Бокал вина или коктейль тут обойдется так же, как и основное блюдо, если не больше.

Posted in Азия, Русский, Таиланд, Чианг Май

Таиланд – День 6

CLICK HERE FOR ENGLISH VERSION. АНГЛОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ.

23 марта 2018

Наш второй запланированный кулинарный класс состоялся сегодня в Чианг Мае. Утром за нами в отель заехала машина из кулинарной школы, и нас забрали вместе с постояльцами еще двух отелей.

Прибыв в школу, мы долго не могли понять, почему нас посадили за стол, а наших попутчиков оставили ждать у входа, а потом посадили на другую машину вместе с другой группой новоприбывших и куда-то повезли. Потом, уже при просмотре рекламного флаера школы, мы поняли, что они предлагают уроки в школе и на ферме и судя по всему, уехавшие забронировали урок на ферме.

IMG_3581

К нам же подсадили французскую пару и две разные компании американцев и дали меню. Здесь принцип немного отличался от бангкокского. Из семи групп блюд нам на нашем полудневном уроки предлагалось приготовить пять, причем три из них – пасту для карри, само карри и спринг роллы были в обязательном порядке, а из оставшихся четырех наша группа должна была совместно выбрать два. Мы выбрали стир фрай и десерт, и не выбрали суп и салат. Зато из каждой выбранной группы каждый мог индивидуально выбрать себе блюдо. Например, я выбрала курицу с острым базиликом как стир фрай (многие взяли пад тай, но его мы уже готовили в Бангкоке), местный вид карри под названием кау сой и пасту для него же, бананы в кокосовом молоке на десерт, ну и спринг роллы были только одного вида.

cof

Нас вывели в огородик прямо при школе и снова показали и дали понюхать часто используемые в тайской кухне ингредиенты: зеленый лук, порей, лемонграсс, листья каффирового лайма, разные виды базилика, корни имбиря, галангала, куркумы и женьшеня.

IMG_3583

IMG_3585

Потом мы прогулялись к местному базарчику – через очень интересные места с гостевыми домами и кафешками, судя по всему, для бекпекеров и прочих бюджетных туристов.

IMG_3588

IMG_3593

IMG_3596

На базаре наша инструктор по имени Да показала нам разные пряности, готовые пасты для карри, виды лапши и риса. Я подумала, что для проблемы отсутствия дома нужных ингредиентов можно найти как краткосрочное, так и долгосрочное решение – и купила как набор сушеных ингредиентов для супа том ям, так и семена каффир-лайма.

IMG_3591

А дальше мы вернулись в школу и принялись за дело. Надо сказать, тут нам было дано больше самостоятельности – мы практически все готовили сами. Кстати, до того как мы принялись за дело, нам подали закуску – листья, в которые надо было завернуть арахис, имбирь, лук, перец чили и кусочек жареного кокоса, и положить ложечку сладкого соуса. Потом все должны были сказать “чок ди” – это вроде пожелания удачи – и, как ни забавно, “чокнуться” этим мешочком перед тем, как положить его в рот.

Стир фрай, как водится, готовился очень легко и быстро, к моему полагался уже готовый рис.

cof

cof

Потом из группы выбрали двух доброволиц, которые приготовили чуть бОльшую порцию примерно по такому же принципу, для начинки спринг роллов. А дальше каждый уже сам заворачивал желаемое количество этой начинки в выданный ему блинчик и обжаривал его во фритюре.

cof

После этого мы готовили пасту для карри. Так получилось, что никто не выбрал зеленый карри, а для всех остальных – красного карри, карри пананг, кау сой и массаман (последнее, кстати, тоже никто не выбрал) – базовая паста готовится одинаково, и только потом добавляются разные другие ингредиенты.

cof

cof

Собственно в пасту для красного карри идут размоченный в воде сушеный перец чили, лук, чеснок, куркума, женьшень, шкурка каффир-лайма и лемонграсс. А дальше для кау сой добавляется еще сушеный порошок карри, а для пананга – арахис.

cof

Кстати, само красное карри готовится так же как и зеленое – то есть помимо мяса, пасты, соусов и кокосового молока туда кладутся тайские баклажаны и базилик. А в пананг и кау сой овощи не добавляются. Мой кау сой оказался более жидким, чем другие карри, и в него надо класть лапшу , а не подавать с рисом. Как я поняла, именно это мы и ели позавчера в придорожной забегаловке и приняли за суп-лапшу. Я даже добавила лишнюю ложку пасты карри, так как мне было недостаточно остро!

cof

Где-то в промежутке между приготовлением пасты и карри мы еще умудрились быстренько сварганить десерт. В моем случае это было дело нехитрое: просто сварить нарезанные бананы в кокосовом молоке с сахаром. Интересно, что нарезая этот вид бананов, мы обнаружили в них черные семена , которые пришлось выковыривать – никогда ничего подобного не видела!

cof

cof

В общем, здешний класс тоже очень понравился, в том числе и немного повышенным уровнем сложности после бангкокского. Нас ожидает еще один кулинарные класс, в Пхукете, посмотрим, каким будет он.

Наш гид с шофером заехали за нами прямо в кулинарную школу, и отсюда мы поехали в последний запланированный программой храм в Таиланде на горе Дой Сутеп.

В храме и его окрестностях очень людно (как водится, значительно превалируют китайцы). Чтобы попасть к самому храму, приходится преодолеть 306 ступенек пешком по жаре. К счастью, на верху горы дует приятный ветерок.

IMG_3601

IMG_3604

Заходишь в храм – и глазам больно от золотого блеска вокруг. Вид, конечно, роскошный, но что интересно – и в этом мнении мы сошлись с подругой, когда делились впечатлениями от нашего путешествия – здешние храмы не вызывают никакого чувства умиротворения, они для этого какие-то слишком помпезные, что ли. Впрочем, вполне возможно, что это нас просто водят по таким, и что где-то в горах есть такие храмы и монастыри, сокрытые от туристических глаз, где спокойствие, умиротворение и хочется медитировать. Здесь же, хоть и имеется уголок медитации, использовать его по назначению как-то вообще не тянет.

IMG_3610

IMG_3617

IMG_3621

Золоченая ступа (или чеди, как их тут называют) в центре храма тоже содержит священную буддийскую реликвию – какую-то кость Будды – и по легенде, эту реликвию погрузили на слона и предоставили ему возможность выбрать место для храма, а он пришел именно сюда.

IMG_3606

IMG_3621

IMG_3637

Кстати, как я уже говорила, по территории Индокитая разбросаны ступы, имеющие особое символическое значение для родившихся в определенный год восточного зодиака. Для здешней ступы это год козла.

Еще при монастыре находится смотровая площадка с видом на весь Чианг Май, но слишком туманно для того, чтобы что-то можно было разглядеть.

IMG_3636

IMG_3643

IMG_3644

Причем такая туманная дымка в Чианг Мае и в Чианг Рае все время, что мы тут, настолько, что солнце по утрам и ближе к закату выглядит как оранжевый апельсин в небе.

IMG_3579

Вернувшись в отель и распрощавшись с нашим гидом, мы немного отдохнули и направились в массажный салон, который мы заранее выбрали, опираясь на отзывы в интернете, и зарезервировали онлайн. Надо сказать, понравилось меньше, чем в Чианг Рае, хотя тут и слегка дороже.

Для ужина мы облюбовали симпатичный японский ресторан на балкончике на втором этаже, с видом на ночной рынок, сели прямо с краю. Но тут чуть не подпортил дело внезапно пошедший дождь – первый раз за все пребывание в Таиланде! – и пока мы сориентировались, что к чему, места под навесом и приличные места внутри уже оказались заняты, а нам пришлось переместиться внутрь в какой-то угол. К счастью, дождь скоро прекратился, и любезные официантки в очередной раз пересадили нас – обратно на балкон, за прекрасный столик.

cof

Единственное, что скрасило наше сидение за дурацким угловым столом внутри, это забавный эпизод за соседним столом: там сидела девушка, китаянка, и ожидала свой заказ на вынос. Вдруг к ней подошли две женщины в возрасте – возможно, мать и тетя, например – и стали показывать ей какие-то штаны, купленные на ночном рынке, да еще и с таким энтузиазмом и восторгом, размахивая руками и ногами, что мы смотрели на них во все глаза и девушка аж смутилась и попросила их вести себя потише. Вообще редко увидишь такую искреннюю и неподдельную радость, а особенно весело, когда эта радость вызвана двумя парами штанов! 🙂

Posted in Asia, Chiang Mai, English, Thailand

Thailand – Day 6

РУССКОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ. CLICK HERE FOR RUSSIAN VERSION.

23 March 2018

We had our second planned cooking class today in Chiang Mai. In the morning we got picked up from the hotel by the cooking school’s own car, along with the a few more people from two other hotels.

Once we arrived at the school, it took us a while to understand what was going on – for some reason we were seated at a table, while our fellow car travelers were left to wait at the entrance, and then were put on a different car together with another group of newcomers and taken somewhere. Only after seeing the school’s advertising leaflet, we realised that they were offering classes both here, at the school, and on a farm, and apparently those guys had booked a farm class.

IMG_3581

Eventually, our group was formed – apart from us, it consisted of a French couple and two different companies of Americans. We were then given the menu. Here the concept was slightly different from what we saw in Bangkok. Out of seven categories of dishes, we were supposed to cook five on our half-day class, and three of them – curry paste, curry and spring rolls – were pre-selected for us, so our group had to agree and choose two more out of the remaining four. We chose stir-fry and dessert, and did not choose soup and salad. And then, everyone could individually pick their own dish from each chosen category. For example, I chose hot basil stir fried chicken (many went for pad thai, but we had already made that in Bangkok); a local kind of curry called khaw soi and the respective curry paste; bananas in coconut milk for dessert; and as for spring rolls, there was only one variety.

cof

The school has its own vegetable garden, and we went there to see and smell the ingredients frequently used in Thai cuisine: green onions, leeks, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, various kinds of basil, roots of ginger, galangal, turmeric and ginseng.

IMG_3583

IMG_3585

Then we walked all the way to the local market, passing by very interesting places with guest house and cafes, apparently for backpackers and other budget tourists.

IMG_3588

IMG_3593

IMG_3596

At the market, our instructor named Da showed us different spices, ready-made curry pastes, various kinds of noodles and rice. Here I found both a short-term and a long-term solution to my problem of the lack of vital ingerdients back home – and bought a pack of dried ingredients for tom yum soup, as well as kaffir lime seeds.

IMG_3591

And then we came back to the cooking school and got down to business. I must say, here we were given more independence and almost made everything by ourselves. By the way, before we started cooking, we were given a snack – leaves, in which we had to wrap peanuts, small pieces of ginger, onion, chili, roasted coconut, and add a spoonful of sweet sauce. Then everyone had to say ‘chok dee’ – which kind of means ‘good luck’ – and, however funny it may seem, toast each other by “clinking” the little wraps before putting them in our mouths.

The stir fries, as usual, were very quick and easy to make, and I got some pre-cooked rice to go with mine.

cof

cof

Then, two volunteers were chosen from the group, and they made a slightly larger portion of a somewhat generic stir fry, for the spring roll filling. And everyone had to wrap the desired amount of this filling in a provided pancake and deep fry their spring roll.

cof

After that, we made the curry paste. It turned out that no one chose green curry, and for all the others – red curry, panang curry, khaw soi and massaman curry (nobody chose the last one either) – the base paste is exactly the same, with several different ingredients added later on.

cof

cof

What goes into red curry paste is the following: pre-soaked dried chili peppers, garlic, turmeric, ginseng, kaffir lime zest and lemongrass. And then you would need to add dried curry powder to make khaw soi paste or crushed peanuts for panang curry paste.

cof

By the way, red curry itself is made just like green curry – i.e. with Thai eggplants and basil in addition to meat, curry paste, sauces and coconut milk. As for panang curry and khaw soi, they are made without the vegetables. My khaw soi was more liquid than the other curries and had to be served with noodles rather than rice. As I understood, that’s exactly what we ate and took for noodle soup in that roadside eatery the day before yesterday. I even added an extra spoonful of curry paste, since it wasn’t spicy enough!

cof

At some point between making the curry paste and the curry itself, we somehow managed to squeeze in the dessert preparation. In my case, this was a simple matter: I just had to boil sliced ​​bananas in coconut milk with sugar. Interestingly, while slicing this kind of bananas, we came across big black seeds which we had to pick out – I had never seen anything like that!

cof

cof

In general, we really liked the Chiang Mai cooking class as well, especially its slightly higher level of complexity after the Bangkok one. There is yet another cooking class awaiting us in Phuket, we have to see what it’s going to be like!

Our guide and driver picked us up at the culinary school, and from there we drove to our last temple in Thailand, planned in the tour programme, on Mount Doi Suthep.

The temple and its surroundings are very croded (as usual, Chinese tourists predominate). To get to the temple itself, one has to walk up 306 stairs in the heat. Fortunately, there is a nice cool breeze atop the mountain.

IMG_3601

IMG_3604

You walk into the temple – the golden shine all around makes your eyes hurt. The view is, of course, magnificent, but interestingly – and we agreed on this with my friend when sharing our impressions of the trip – the temples here don’t give you that sense of peacefull bliss, they seem too pompous for that. However, it’s quite possible that it’s just us being taken to such temples, and that somewhere in the mountains, hidden from the tourist’s eye, there are temples and monasteries where you’d find peace and tranquility and want to meditate. Here, even though there is a meditation corner, you don’t quite feel like using it as intended.

IMG_3610

IMG_3617

IMG_3621

The gilded stupa (or chedi, as they are also called here) in the center of the temple also contains a sacred Buddhist relic – a bone of Lord Buddha – and according to a legend, this relic was loaded on an elephant, which was given an opportunity to pick a spot for the temple, and so the animal came here.

IMG_3606

IMG_3621

IMG_3637

By the way, as I have already said, there are stupas scattered all around Indochina, which have a special symbolic significance for those born in a certain year of the Eastern zodiac. The local stupa is associated with the year of the goat.

There is also an observation deck on the territory of the temple, with a view of entire Chiang Mai, but it’s too foggy to see anything at all.

IMG_3636

IMG_3643

IMG_3644

And we’ve been seeing this foggy haze during all the time of our stay both in Chiang Mai and in Chiang Rai, to the extent that in the morning and closer to the sunset the sun looks like an orange tangerine in the sky.

IMG_3579

Once back at our hotel and having said goodbye to our guide, we rested for a bit and headed out to a massage parlor, which we had found based on Internet reviews and booked online. I must say, I liked it less than the one in Chiang Rai, although it was slightly more expensive.

For dinner, we chose a nice Japanese restaurant with a terrace on the second floor and a view over the night market, and sat down outside. But then the whole dinner nearly got ruined by a sudden rain – our first one in Thailand! – and while we waited to see whether it would stop quickly, all the outdoors tables under the canopy and decent tables inside were already occupied, so we had to sit at some tiny table in the corner inside. Luckily, the rain soon stopped and the waitresses kindly moved us back to a lovely table on the terrace.

cof

The only thing that brightened our time at the stupid corner table inside, was a funny episode at the next table: there was a young Chinese lady sitting there and waiting for her take-away. Suddenly, two older women approached her – perhaps, her mother and aunt, for example – and started showing her some harem pants they bought at the night market, with such delight and enthusiasm, almost jumping up and down with excitement, that we couldn’t help staring at them which made the younger woman quite embarassed, so she asked them to behave more quietly. I have to say, it’s not very often that you see such sincere and genuine joy, let alone when it’s caused by two pairs of pants! 🙂

Posted in Asia, Chiang Mai, English, Thailand

Thailand – Day 5

РУССКОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ. CLICK HERE FOR RUSSIAN VERSION.

22 March 2018

And once again we had to forget about our sundresses and put on our elephant harem pants purchased in Bangkok, as pretty much the whole of today is dedicated to temples in Chiang Rai and its environs.

In general, there are lots and lots of temples in Thailand, people seem much more religious than, for example, in Vietnam or China, and it’s much more common to see monks everywhere. That’s quite understandable – the country hasn’t been colonised recently, it has no communist past or present, so obviously, religion hasn’t been historically oppressed. And by the way, Buddhism here seems to contain elements of Hinduism.

The first temple we went to was Wat Phra Singh, founded in the 14th century. The name of this temple comes from the golden Buddha image, almost as famous (and as ‘well-traveled’) as the Emerald Buddha. Our guide Dino said that the temple’s architecture is in Burmese style.

IMG_3464

IMG_3471

IMG_3474

What was specifically remarkable about this temple is the large number of stray dogs that are fed here, apparently with rice, given their state of utter apathy; and sal trees, sacred to Buddhists, with large and very fragrant flowers.

IMG_3472

IMG_3481

IMG_3483

From here we headed to another temple – Wat Phra Keo, or the temple of the Emerald Buddha. Yes, yes, it has the same name as the one we saw in Bangkok. The temple is very old and was originally called something else, but in the 15th century, it was here, among the wreckage of a stupa split by a thunderbolt, that the Emerald Buddha statue, believed to be of divine origin, was found. Since the 18th century and up to this day, the statue is in Bangkok, just where we saw it, but before that it traveled a lot around the territories of Thailand, Laos, Myanmar and Cambodia. Dino talked about the statue’s displacements in the most thorough details – who and when took/stole it, who robbed whom etc. – but we didn’t even try to memorise all this, especially since he wasn’t the most interesting narrator ever…

IMG_3488

IMG_3521

The Chiang Rai temple currently has a jade replica of the Emerald Buddha (in fact, as you may remember, the original one is also made of jade) but at least, unlike in Bangkok, you can photograph it.

IMG_3512

Right here, on the territory of the temple, we noticed a pond with turtles and spent quite a while watching one particular small, but proud turtle trying to crawl towards the fence, walking on the heads of its fellow turtles.

IMG_3508

The third temple we saw was really the best – it was the White temple, very beautiful and unusual. It’s quite new, having been built in 1997, and in fact I would rather call it a modern art exhibit in the style of a Buddhist Temple.

IMG_3533

IMG_3563

IMG_3560

The white colour represents spiritual purity.

IMG_3555

IMG_3564

To get into the temple itself, one has to walk along a bridge past the “hands of sinners” sticking out of the earth – very symbolic.

IMG_3556

Right next to the temple there’s a museum containing paintings by Chalermchai Kositpipat – the artist who built this temple with his own money. The paintings are quite interesting, many depict paradise with different buildings in the same style as the White Temple, or mythological animals.

The gorgeous gilded building on the territory of the temple is nothing more than the ‘happy room’ (or rather a whole happy palace!), that is, a toilet.

IMG_3566

Fortunately for us, the thickest crowds of tourists started arriving just as we were leaving – most probably from Chiang Mai – so we were really lucky to walk around and take pictures without them.

The White Temple was our last stop before we drove off to Chiang Mai – we had already checked out from our Chiang Rai hotel this morning and loaded our suitcases in the car. We stopped on our way for lunch, again in a cheap roadside cafe, with a hot spring next to it. In one fenced well, the water was boiling and bubbling up, another one was used for cooking eggs, and there was also a bigger section of the spring which was cool enough to put one’s legs into it, which is supposedly very good for health. Some people managed to sit knee-deep in the water, but I was barely able to dip my feet for a couple of seconds, as the water was very hot – around 50 degrees Celsius – the exact opposite situation of yesterday’s pool visit in Chiang Rai!

IMG_3572

IMG_3574

IMG_3575

We arrived at our hotel in Chiang Mai at about 3pm. The hotel is located next to the night market, so there are lots of market stalls, massage parlours and bars around.

The hotel has two excellent swimming pools, and this time we had better luck and managed to take a dip. And we knew right away that we’d be more lucky – unlike in Chiang Rai, the poolside area was full of people.

IMG_3577

cof

Our tour programme for the evening included a trip to the street food market and dinner right there. We tried pork satay (i.e. pork skewers) with peanut sauce, snapper fish in salt and some pork dish with rice. It was quite tasty, although not necessarily much cheaper than in a restaurant.

cof

cof

cof

cof

cof

On the way back to the hotel our guide Dino took a longer route so that we could walk around the Old Town, which we didn’t enjoy much – there was little to see in the dark, plus we wanted to rest a bit and enjoy some guide-less time.

Once we said goodbye to him, we went for a drink at one of the bars near the hotel, but left very quickly – the place seemed a bit dodgy, with a few foreign men and a lot of half-naked local women (if they were all women, of course), rushing with open arms towards every white man in sight trying to lure him into the bar. It seems that all the bars around are like that, and many are even completely empty, except for the stacks of women waiting at the entrance.

Posted in Азия, Русский, Таиланд, Чианг Май

Таиланд – День 5

CLICK HERE FOR ENGLISH VERSION. АНГЛОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ.

22 марта 2018

И снова пришлось забыть про открытые сарафанчики и облачиться в купленные в Бангкоке шаровары – практически весь сегодняшний день посвящен храмам в Чианг Рае и его окрестностях.

Вообще различных храмов в Таиланде великое множество, люди кажутся гораздо более религиозными, чем например во Вьетнаме или Китае, и монахи встречаются гораздо чаще. Оно и понятно – страну в ближайшем прошлом никто не колонизировал, коммунистического прошлого и настоящего у нее нет, так что религию явно никто не притеснял. А еще, буддизм тут с элементами индуизма.

Первый храм, куда мы поехали, это Ват Пхра Сингх, основанный в XIV веке. Имя этого храма происходит от золотой статуи Будды, почти такой же известной, как Изумрудный Будда, и столько же путешествовавшей. Наш гид Дино рассказал, что архитектура храма выполнена в бирманском стиле.

IMG_3464

IMG_3471

IMG_3474

Чем особенно запомнился храм, так это большим количеством бездомных собак, которых тут кормят, явно рисом, отчего они находятся в состоянии полной апатии, и священными для буддистов деревьями сала, с большими и очень ароматными цветами.

IMG_3472

IMG_3481

IMG_3483

Отсюда мы отправились в другой храм – Ват Пхра Кео, он же храм Изумрудного Будды. Да-да, он называется так же, как тот, который мы видели в Бангкоке. Храм очень старый и изначально назывался как-то иначе, но именно тут среди обломков ступы, расколотой ударом молнии, и была в XV веке обнаружена статуя Изумрудного Будды, которая по поверию имеет божественное происхождение. С XVII века и по сей день статуя находится в Бангкоке, где мы ее и видели, а до того она очень много путешествовала по территории Таиланда, Лаоса, Мьянмы и Камбоджи. Дино даже рассказывал подробно обо всех перипетиях ее перемещения – кто и когда ее вывез, украл, кого ограбил и т.д. – но мы даже не пытались запомнить все это, тем более, что рассказывал он не слишком интересно…

IMG_3488

IMG_3521

В чианграйском храме в данный момент находится копия Изумрудного Будды из нефрита (собственно, и оригинал, как вы помните, из него же), зато ее можно фотографировать, чего нельзя было делать в Бангкоке.

IMG_3512

Тут же, на территории храма, мы заметили пруд с черепахами и некоторое время наблюдали как одна маленькая, но гордая птичка черепаха все пыталась ползти куда-то наверх к ограде по головам своих соплеменников.

IMG_3508

А третий храм понравился больше всего – этот Белый храм, очень красивый и необычный. Он совсем новый – построен в 1997г, и по сути даже скорее представляет собой выставку современного искусства в стиле храма.

IMG_3533

IMG_3563

IMG_3560

Белый цвет олицетворяет духовную чистоту.

IMG_3555

IMG_3564

Чтобы попасть в сам храм, надо пройти по мостику мимо “рук грешников”, торчащих из земли – очень символично.

IMG_3556

Тут же рядом музей картин художника Чалермчая Коситпипата – того, который на свои деньги и построил этот храм. Картины довольно интересные, многие изображают рай с различными строениями в том же стиле, как и сам храм, либо мифологических животных.

Шикарное золоченое здание на территории храма – это не что иное как “комната (а точнее, целый дворец!) счастья”, то бишь туалет.

IMG_3566

На наше счастье, толпы туристов подъехали как раз когда мы уже уходили – судя по всему, из Чианг Мая – так что удалось погулять и пофотографироваться без них.

А вот мы отсюда как раз выехали в Чианг Май – чемоданы в машину были погружены еще с утра. Остановились по дороге пообедать, снова в дешевой придорожной кафешке при горячем источнике. В одном огороженном колодце вода прямо бурлила и кипела, в другом варились яйца, а еще в одну секцию источника можно было погружать ноги, якобы очень полезно. Некоторые ухитрялись сидеть по колено в воде, но мне едва удавалось окунуть ступни на пару секунд, очень горячо – градусов 50 – полная противоположность вчерашнему чианграйскому бассейну!

IMG_3572

IMG_3574

IMG_3575

Добрались мы до отеля в Чианг Мае часа в три, расположен отель у ночного базара, вокруг барахолка, множество баров и массажных салонов.

В отеле два прекрасных бассейна, и на этот раз удалось выкупаться. И сразу было понятно, что удастся – в отличие от чианграйского бассейна, в этом было полно народу.

IMG_3577

cof

На вечер у нас был по программе заплкнирован поход на рынок уличной еды с поеданием оной. Мы попробовали свиной сатай (шашлычки на шпажках) с арахисовым соусом, рыбу снеппер в соли и какое-то блюдо из свинины с рисом. Было вкусно, хотя не сказать, что значительно дешевле, чем было бы в ресторане.

cof

cof

cof

cof

cof

На пути обратно в отель гид Дино сделал круг, чтобы мы могли прогуляться по Старому городу, чем не доставил нам огромного удовольствия – в темноте мало что видно и понятно, хотелось уже отдохнуть и вообще уже распрощаться с ним.

Как только нам это удалось, мы зашли выпить по коктейлю в один из баров около отеля, но ушли очень быстро – заведение показалось левеньким, с некоторым количеством мужчин-иностранцев и большим количеством полуголых местных женщин (если они все были женщинами, конечно), кидающихся с распростертыми объятиями на каждого проходящего мимо белого мужчину и пытающихся завлечь его в бар. Кажется, все бары вокруг такие же, многие вообще пустуют за исключением стаек женщин, ожидающих у входа.

Posted in Asia, Chiang Rai, English, Thailand

Thailand – Day 4

РУССКОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ. CLICK HERE FOR RUSSIAN VERSION.

21 March 2018

Today we left our hotel at 8am for our first excursion in Chiang Rai and headed up north, to the Doi Tung Royal villa with a beautiful garden.

IMG_3367

The garden is one of the successful projects of the late Queen Mother, who tried to combat drug trafficking in this dysfunctional region, bordering Myanmar, by increasing employment.

IMG_3380

IMG_3381

IMG_3386

IMG_3387

And indeed, the garden is very beautiful. At an altitude of 1300 m above sea level, it is much cooler than Chiang Rai itself, and full of the most diverse flowers ever – predominantly European, but including some local orchids too.

IMG_3393

IMG_3397

IMG_3399

IMG_3404

The actual royal villa, where the Queen Mother used to live, is located further uphill. We went up to the residence – again, strict dress code had to be followed there and we had to cover up – and went inside. I managed to take one photo before a lady from a French tourist group – the only tourists apart from us, I wonder where the crowds of Chinese tourists are? – warned me that this was prohibited.

IMG_3411

The residence is essentially a huge wooden hut, the entire interior is also made of wood. Some of the Queen’s personal belongings are exhibited, in particular tools for embroidery and pottery. The balcony provides stunning views of the garden that we saw before.

IMG_3414

There is another attraction at the very top of the Doi Tung mountain, where we had to get by car. These are two stupas in a typical Lanna style, erected as far back as the 10th century and containing Lord Buddha’s relics – namely, his collarbone.

IMG_3420

IMG_3425

There is also a temple next to the stupas, very intricate from the outside, but not particularly remarkable inside. As for the stupas themselves, we couldn’t come close to them – women are not allowed to.

IMG_3429

IMG_3430

By the way, our guide Dino told us that these stupas were especially sacred for people born in the year of the Pig (or Elephant) according to the Eastern Zodiac. And for each of the zodiacal animals, there are respective stupas all around Indochina. It is believed that everyone should visit the stupa corresponding to their zodiacal animals and pray there at least once during their lifetime.

On the way back down to our car we descended a stepped alley with lots and lots of bells of different sizes at the sides.

IMG_3432

It was already lunch time, and we stopped at some roadside eatery. I had read somewhere that in Thailand the most delicious food can be found right in such non-glamorous places (in China as well, by the way – as confirmed by myself), and it turned out to be exactly the case! We got two servings of spicy chicken noodle soup, and we liked it a lot. And it cost us 70 baht for two, which didn’t even make 3 USD!

selfp

After lunch we drove to the town of Mae Sai at the very border with Myanmar. Dino said that Thai, Burmese, Indian, and Chinese people live here, and everyone gets along very well: Muslims, Buddhists, and Christians. In Mae Sai we visited a jade shop and walked past a street market, which, apparently, Dino himself was much more interested in than we were.

IMG_3438

IMG_3443

IMG_3444

But what was really interesting to see was the gate separating Thailand from Myanmar. We asked, how far away from here the Golgen Triangle was – that is, the place where the borders of Thailand, Myanmar and Laos meet. We were told that it was a 35-minute drive, for which we’d have to pay extra to the driver and that we’d still need to get permission to get on a Mekong tour boat.

IMG_3445

IMG_3451

We decided that we didn’t want to go there and headed back to Chiang Rai. Once back at the hotel and left to ourselves, we went straight to the swimming pool, which we’d been drooling over for two days now. But it was no coincidence that the area around the pool was completely empty all the time, which we were really surprised about. The water turned out to be so icy cold that I could not even dip my toe in it, let alone get in there.

Mission unaccomplished! But we went again to get a wonderful massage in the same parlour as yesterday. There are plenty of such parlours on our street, but as we already tested this one yesterday and were very happy with it, we saw no point in looking for something else. And after the massage, as we were intending to go for dinner, we accidentally spotted a cat in the window of a small coffee shop, and then many more cats. We’d noticed this coffee shop, called Cat’n’Cup, yesterday, but somehow didn’t realise that it was a cat cafe. So how could we resist going in to have a frappe and to pet some furry purring felines!

selfp

Well, the latter actually turned out a bummer: we were still smelling of massage oil with a citrus aroma, which by cat standards meant that we were stinking sickeningly! So they avoided us at all costs, although we did see one or two curious faces on our table!

selfp

sdr

Then we went to have dinner in an open-air restaurant, right around the corner from the night market. It was a very pleasant place, and next to it there was a stage, from which we were entertained first with Chinese music, then with English-language guitar songs, and finally with Thai dances.

sdr