Travelling Leila

My impressions about the places I visit

Archive for the month “June, 2017”

Vietnam – Day 3

РУССКОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ. CLICK HERE FOR RUSSIAN VERSION.

7 June 2017

Today’s Ho Chi Minh City tour was supposed to happen yesterday, but as the presidential Reunification Palace, which was one of the items on our list, was closed yesterday for a government event, the travel agency had to slightly amend our schedule.

IMG_2322

It was actually at this palace that our tour began this morning. Before the war there was the South Vietnamese Independence Palace here, however, it was a different building, a 19th-century one in the French colonial style. During the war, that one was bombed, so a new, more modern palace was built in its place later, becoming a symbol of the unified Vietnam.

Generally, there was a lot of history today and in the first half of the day it was mainly contemporary history. So, standing next to this tank, which is a replica of the exact North Vietnamese tanks that rammed the Palace gate in 1975 and actually marked the end of the Vietnam war and the victory of the North, Phuoc gave us a brief overview of Vietnamese history since the First Indochina War against the French colonialists, which began in 1946, followed by the Second Indochina War, also known as the Vietnam War of 1955-1975.

IMG_2326

The palace itself has maybe a few dozens of rooms and halls, but only three are currently used for government events. Some of the rest are only demonstrated as a museum, and I don’t even know what they do with the others. The basement, for example, used to be a bunker, and is now closed for reconstruction.

IMG_2330

IMG_2331

IMG_2340

IMG_2341

Next, we stopped at the Notre-Dame Cathedral Basilica of Saigon , built by the French, obviously, and also located directly opposite the Post Office building, which is another place of interest. There isn’t particularly much to tell about either, especially that we didn’t spend a lot of time there, just walked in, looked around and left.

IMG_2362

IMG_2355

IMG_2357

What followed next felt kind of like bitter medicine – unpalatable but useful. It was the War Remnants Museum, which, by the way, before the restoration of diplomatic relations with the USA used to be called Exhibition House for US Crimes. It’s a rather eerie place exhibiting military equipment, war photos (including those of the Songmi massacre and the victims of napalm and white phosphorus bombs), a guillotine, the replica of a South Vietnamese jail for political prisoners, and – most horrible of all! – photographs of victims of Agent Orange (a toxic chemical, repeatedly spread by Americans in Vietnam) with birth defects and mutations. And not only local people had children born with defects, so did also American soldiers after returning home. In Vietnam, there are still a lot of disabled people who are victims of those chemical attacks: we saw some of them both at the Notre Dame Cathedral, asking for alms, and at the museum itself, producing various crafts for sale – unfortunately, the state doesn’t have enough money to support them, so they have to find means to survive on their own.

20170607_105736

20170607_112658

20170607_113416

20170607_114024

It was all very sad and made me think a lot – mostly about the fact that history doesn’t teach people anything at all, especially in the light of the most recent political events in the world… Now of course, the inscriptions under the exhibits in the War Remnants Museum are characterised by political propaganda, in particular, the northerners are only mentioned as “patriot soldiers” and the South Vietnamese government is called a puppet. We so didn’t expect such evaluative language in the seemingly narrative description of military events, that when we saw a table listing the number of troops from various states, among which the South Vietnamese Puppet was mentioned, we asked ourselves whether the word ‘puppet’ actually meant something different in military jargon, because we simply couldn’t believe that it was meant in its most direct sense.

20170607_105000

20170607_104013

We decided to grab food in a coffee shop right at the museum, and had banh mi –
traditional Vietnamese baguettes (French heritage, as I mentioned before) with chicken, tasting like ordinary doner kebab .

After contemporary history we plunged into more ancient one, also much more positive and entertaining: we went to the privately-owned FITO Museum of traditional Vietnamese medicine. The interior was very interesting, in the traditional Vietnamese style of the 19th century, although the building itself is new.

IMG_2373

IMG_2376

We got to see an introductory video and then a nice lady showed us the exhibits – there was a huge number of antique dishes, medicinal substances (herbs, minerals, mushrooms etc.), tables listing medicinal plants, half-decayed medical treatises by ancient doctors, written in Chinese characters, etc. We were offered to try on traditional clothes of Vietnamese doctors and pose for a photo behind a pharmacy counter. And also, some of the medicines are mentioned in connection with the emperor Minh Mang, although I can’t remember whether he made them himself or had them invented specially for him. But what’s noteworthy is that the emperor had 500 wives and could visit 5 of them in one night!

20170607_124229

20170607_124409

20170607_125118

20170607_125315

By the way, I didn’t mention Chinese characters just randomly. In fact they were used in Vietnam up until early 20th century, when the French colonial government imposed a switch to a romanised alphabet. In this alphabet, the standard five vowels (or six, if “y” is also considered as one) come with all sorts of diacritical marks: not only are there twelve vowels in Vietnamese, but each one can also be pronounced with six different tones, changing the meaning of the word.

Phuoc tells us all this in the car on the way to the local Chinatown. There are about a million Chinese in Vietnam, many of which don’t even speak Chinese anymore. In Ho Chi Minh City they mainly own wholesale stores. In Chinatown we visited the Thien Hau temple of the Chinese sea goddess. By the way, I’ve already been to another temple dedicated to her in Hong Kong. Among other information about Chinese traditional beliefs, Phuoc told us about the 12-year cycle of the Eastern calendar – in particular that previously before a wedding the bride’s and groom’s horoscope signs used to be checked for compatibility, but nowadays clever couples come up with ways to avoid incompatibility, such as arranging the marriage ceremony at midnight instead of midday, or walking into the house for the first time through the back door instead of the front door.

IMG_2388

IMG_2391

And finally, we visited a lacquer factory. Initially, the technique, like much else, as we have already found out, was brought by the French, but then local craftsmen mastered the skill so much that they pretty much took it to the next level. This work is manual, and very laborious and complex. First, a black wooden board is prepared – which of course should be absolutely smooth – then a picture is drawn on it, then either a part is cut out of mother-of-pearl along the outline of the pattern and stuck to the board, or the contour of the picture is filled with pieces of egg shell (which can even be completely crushed) or paint, and then the painting is covered with fifteen layers of lacquer made of lacquer tree sap, and each layer must fully dry before the next one can be applied. Unfortunately, taking pictures at the factory wasn’t allowed, otherwise it would be very interesting to capture the process of creating lacquerware.

This was the end of the Saigon part of our tour, and we said goodbye to Phuoc. It was about 4 o’clock in the afternoon, and we decided to find an electronics store to buy additional memory cards for our cameras. I must say, the walk was rather stupid: the store which Phuoc had noted for us on the city map didn’t have the card I needed, and the sellers gave us the address of another store, which we spent ages looking for and as a result found out that it was quite close to our hotel. Had we known that in advance, we wouldn’t even have had to drag ourselves that far in this humid heat. We were quite lucky today that there was no rain at all, but the flip side of that is this sticky heat, as the rain would have refreshed the air.

We continued walking until we reached the Barbecue Garden restaurant, which we chose for today’s dinner. The restaurant is open-air, mostly attended by foreigners, and has a very interesting concept: the barbecue ingredients are served raw, which you then have to grill yourself over the gas burner located right in the centre of your table. Once again we really liked everything and the prices were shockingly low: only 32 dollars for two for snacks, barbecue, side dishes, fruit juice, beer and dessert!

20170607_174427

20170607_174726

And after dinner we decided to finally walk up to the river, taking advantage of the dry weather. We reached the river and walked along the embankment, but couldn’t locate that beautiful skyline with illuminated buildings which we’d seen on some postcard. We slightly got used to the traffic, but it still feels stressful for me – I guess, after this in Baku I’ll be able to cross roads with my eyes closed. At some point, we wanted to cross a wide avenue along the embankment, and spent at least five minutes in front of the zebra crossing, because we couldn’t bring ourselves to step into this uninterrupted stream of traffic, before some local girl – thanks to her! – rushed to our help and literally took us across the road, like old grannies!

20170607_194143

20170607_200401

20170607_200443

20170607_201126

Advertisements

Вьетнам – День 3

CLICK HERE FOR ENGLISH VERSION. АНГЛОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ.

7 июня 2017

Сегодняшняя экскурсия по Хошимину вообще должна была состояться вчера, но поскольку президентский Дворец Объединения Вьетнама, являвшийся одним из пунктов программы, вчера был закрыт по случаю правительственного мероприятия, турагентство несколько изменило планы.

Собственно, именно с этого дворца с утра и началась наша экскурсия. До войны здесь находился Дворец Независимости Южного Вьетнама, правда, это было совсем другое здание, XIX века во французском колониальном стиле. Во время войны его разбомбили, поэтому вместо него построили новый, более современный дворец, а символизировать он стал объединенный Вьетнам.

IMG_2322

Вообще, сегодня было много истории, причем в первой половине дня – новейшей. Так, стоя у этого танка, являющегося копией северовьетнамского танка, протаранившего ворота Дворца в 1975 году и фактически обозначившего окончание Вьетнамской войны и победу Севера, Фы рассказала нам вкратце историю Вьетнама, начиная с Первой Индокитайской войны против французских колонизаторов, начавшуюся в 1946 году и последовавшую за ней Вторую, также известную как Вьетнамская война 1955-1975гг.

IMG_2326

В самом дворце комнат и залов не один десяток, но в настоящее время для правительственных мероприятий используются только три. Часть остальных только демонстрируется как музей, а что делают с оставшимися – я даже не знаю. В подвале, например, размещался бункер, и сейчас он закрыт на реконструкцию.

IMG_2330

IMG_2331

IMG_2340

IMG_2341

Следующей остановкой были Собор Нотр-Дам, построенный, разумеется французами, а также находящееся прямо напротив здание почты. Про них рассказывать особенно нечего, да и провели мы там не так много времени, фактически зашли, посмотрели и вышли.

IMG_2362

IMG_2355

IMG_2357

То, что последовало дальше, было как горькое лекарство – малоприятное, зато полезное. Это был музей жертв войны, который между прочим, до нормализации отношений с США так и назывался “Музей американских военных преступлений”. Довольно жуткое место, в котором там выставлена и военная техника, и фотографии войны (в том числе резни в Сонгми и жертв напалма и фосфорных бомб), и гильотина, и реплика тюрьмы для политических заключенных, и – самое ужасное! – фотографии жертв агента “оранж” (ядовитого химиката, неоднократно распыляемого американцами на территории Вьетнама) с врожденными дефектами и мутациями. Причем дети с дефектами рождались не только у местных жителей, но и у американских солдат после возвращения домой. Во Вьетнаме таких инвалидов-жертв химической атаки и по сей день очень много: мы видели их и у Собора Нотр-Дам, просящих милостыню, и при самом музее, производящих разные поделки на продажу – у государства, к сожалению, недостаточно денег на их содержание, вот им и приходится как-то самим выживать.

20170607_105736

20170607_112658

20170607_113416

20170607_114024

Очень все это печально, наводит на размышления – в том числе, и о том, что история людей ничему не учит, особенно в свете политических событий на мировой арене в последние годы… Конечно, надписи под экспонатами в музее жертв войны носят характер политической пропаганды, в частности, северяне упоминаются не иначе как “солдаты-патриоты”, а правительство Южного Вьетнама называется марионеточным. Как-то настолько не ожидаешь подобных оценочных эпитетов при вроде бы повествовательном описании военных событий, что когда мы увидели таблицу с численностью войск разных государств, среди которых упоминался South Vietnamese puppet, мы задались вопросом, означает ли слово puppet что-то на военном жаргоне, ибо просто не поверили, что оно подразумевается в самом прямом смысле.

20170607_105000

20170607_104013

Подкрепились мы в кофейне прямо при музее, традиционными вьетнамскими багетами (как я уже говорила, перенятыми у французов), начиненными курицей и напоминающими по вкусу обыкновенный дёнер кебаб.

После новейшей истории окунулись в более древнюю, и гораздо более позитивную и занимательную: отправились в фито-музей вьетнамской традиционной медицины, принадлежащий какому-то частному лицу. Интерьер очень интересный, в традиционном вьетнамском стиле XIX века, хоть само здание и новое.

IMG_2373

IMG_2376

Тут нам показали ознакомительное видео, а потом милая девушка-сотрудница показала экспонаты – тут и огромное количество старинной посуды, и лекарственные вещества (травы, минералы, грибы), и таблицы лечебных растений, и полуистлевшие медицинские трактаты древних врачей, написанные еще китайскими иероглифами. Нам предложили примерить традиционные одежды вьетнамских врачей и попозировать для фото за аптекарским прилавком. А еще, некоторые из лекарственных средств упоминаются в связи с императором Минь Мангом, правда, я не помню, делал ли он их сам или их придумали специально для него. Но примечательно, что у императора было 500 жен и за одну ночь он мог посетить 5 из них!

20170607_124229

20170607_124409

20170607_125118

20170607_125315

Китайские иероглифы я, кстати, упомянула не случайно: до начала ХХ века во Вьетнаме использовали именно их. А после перешли на латиницу, правда к стандартным пяти (или шести, если “y” считать тоже гласной) гласным пришлось добавить всяких закорючек и прочих диакритических знаков: мало того, что гласных во вьетнамском языке 12, так еще и каждая может произноситься с шестью разными тонами, в зависимости от которых меняется значение слова.

Все это нам рассказывает в машине Фы, пока мы едем в местный Чайна-таун. Китайцев во Вьетнаме около миллиона, и многие из них уже даже не говорят по-китайски. В хошиминском Чайна-тауне они в основном держат оптовые лавки. Мы посетили в Чайна-тауне храм богини Тьен Хау, покровительницы морских путешественников. Кстати, в посвященном ей храме я уже была в Гонконге. В числе прочей информации о китайских традиционных верованиях, Фы рассказала нам и о 12-летнем цикле восточного календаря – в частности, о том, как раньше перед свадьбой проверяли знаки восточного гороскопа жениха и невесты на предмет совместимости, но как в наше время хитрые брачующиеся придумывают способы обойти несовместимость, например, устраивают церемонию бракосочетания в полночь вместо полудня, либо впервые заходят вместе в дом через чёрный ход вместо парадного.

IMG_2388

IMG_2391

Ну и напоследок, мы посетили завод лаковых изделий. Изначально техника, как и многое другое, как мы уже выяснили, была принесена французами, но затем местные искусники преуспели в мастерстве создания этих изделий так, как французам и не снилось. Работа эта ручная, и очень кропотливая и сложная. Сначала подготавливается деревянная дощечка – она должна быть, само собой, абсолютно гладкой, – затем на нее наносится рисунок, потом либо выпиливается деталь по контуру рисунка из перламутра и приклеивается к дощечке, либо этот контур заполняется кусочками яичной скорлупы (а то и вовсе раздробленной в крошку скорлупой), либо по контуру рисуется картина красками, ну а затем картина покрывается пятнадцатью слоями лака, изготовленного из сока лакового дерева, причем каждый слой должен полностью высохнуть перед нанесением следующего. Фотографировать на заводе, к сожалению, не разрешили – а то было бы очень интересно запечатлеть процесс создания лаковых изделий.

На этом хошиминская часть официального тура закончилась, и мы распрощались с Фы. Было около 4 часов пополудни, и мы решили отправиться на поиск магазина электроники, чтобы приобрести дополнительные карты памяти для фотоаппарата. Надо сказать, прогулка была довольно бестолковой: в том магазине, который нам отметила на карте Фы, нужной карты не оказалось, продавцы дали адрес другого магазина, который мы искали очень долго и в результате выяснили, что он был довольно недалеко от нашего отеля и если бы мы знали заранее, не пришлось бы по влажной духоте тащиться так далеко. В чем сегодня повезло – так это в том, что вообще не было дождя. Но оборотная сторона этого заключалась именно в такой липкой жаре, так как дождь бы как раз освежил воздух.

Так пешком и дошли до облюбованного для сегодняшнего ужина ресторана Barbecue Garden. Ресторан на открытом воздухе, посетители в основном иностранцы, а концепция его очень интересная: барбекю тебе приносят в сыром виде, а гриль поверх газовой горелки располагается прямо в центре твоего стола, тут блюдо и готовится. Все опять очень понравилось и цены снова поразили: всего 32 доллара на двоих за закуски, барбекю, гарниры, фруктовый сок, пиво и десерт!

20170607_174427

20170607_174726

Ну и после ужина решили в конце-то концов прогуляться до реки, воспользовавшись тем, что нет дождя. Дошли до реки и прошлись по набережной, правда вида на освещенные красивые здания, который мы видели на какой-то открытке, так и не обнаружили. К движению на дорогах уже немного привыкли, но для меня это по-прежнему стресс, после этого в Баку я наверное смогу переходить дорогу с закрытыми глазами. В какой-то момент мы хотели перейти широкий проспект вдоль набережной и наверное минут пять стояли перед “зеброй”, не рискуя ступить в этот непрерывный мотопоток, пока какая-то местная девушка – спасибо ей, – увидев это, не бросилась нам помогать и не перевела нас фактически через дорогу, как бабулек!

20170607_194143

20170607_200401

20170607_200443

20170607_201126

Vietnam – Day 2

РУССКОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ. CLICK HERE FOR RUSSIAN VERSION.

6 June 2017

I may well be unoriginal and repeat what I’ve said before, but I will say it again: what’s particularly nice about breakfasts in Asian hotels is that apart from the usual boring cheeses/sausages/croissants/toasts you can get stir-fried veggies, noodles, dim sum and even pho! Which is exactly what we did before heading down to the reception at 8 am, where our tour guide Phuoc was already waiting for us, ready for the Mekong Delta excursion.

20170607_073939

First of all, we took a two-hour drive in a comfortable SUV to the town of Cai Be in the Mekong Delta region. As we were driving out of Ho Chi Minh City, and also afterwards, I was thinking of my impressions about the surroundings. There are places which make you say “so beautiful that it takes my breath away”. This is not the case. The Vietnam, which we have seen so far, is best described by the epithet “charming”. And in many respects, it’s charming precisely by its imperfection, including chaos on the roads; assemblages of narrow buildings, sometimes shabby, not wider than a single window; street vendors on the sidewalks, and so on.

On the way, Phuoc was telling us how people live in country – about low salaries, about taxes and cases of tax evasion, about how, with the emergence of a free market economy, many are striving to own a business, even if a very small one, and that often all family members, including the elderly, need to work as it’s very difficult to make ends meet otherwise.

At some point, we started talking about dogs and the fact that in Northern Vietnam people still eat them despite the government’s attempts to ban this. In 1945, a terrible famine raged in the north of the country and it were dogs that helped many people survive (not by their own will though!), so some still believe that eating a dog brings good luck. At the same time, this doesn’t prevent the Vietnamese from treating the dog as a man’s best friend and even to welcome stray dogs in their shops or cafes – it turns out that dog barking somehow sounds similar to the Vietnamese word meaning wealth, so again it’s believed that dogs bring good luck, even without being eaten. As for cats, the situation is exactly the opposite, since their ‘meow’ is consonant with the word meaning poverty.

IMG_2293

On the way, we stopped to visit the “happy room” (that’s the euphemism used here for toilet, which is quite logical for travellers) in some interesting place, looking like either a garden or a restaurant. Through Phuoc’s efforts, the stop turned for us into something like a botanical lecture: she basically showed us every plant and explained how and for what purposes it’s used. We really got the impression that the Vietnamese eat almost any stems, leaves, fruits and roots (well, except for poisonous ones obviously), including banana tree stems, and literally every part of the lotus. Then, already back in the car, she showed us some books about tropical plants, flowers and fruits.

IMG_2183

Another fifteen minutes’ drive – and we arrived at Cai Be, where we had to get on a boat and continue the journey on it. The boat was big – like a sampan – enough for 10 people, but it was just for our mini-group. First, we headed off to see the famous fruit and vegetable floating market. The population in the Mekong Delta area is mainly engaged in farming, and growing fruit is a very profitable business. The local climate and fertile land definitely help. But as for rice, for example, growing it is not that financially rewarding – the market price of one tonne barely covers the labour costs of the workers involved in producing this very tonne. Coming back to our floating market, we were told that in the early morning there are particularly many boats selling goods, and by 10 am (which is the time when we arrived), mostly everything is already sold out with only a few boats remaining. That is, to enjoy the floating market in all its glory, we would have had to spend a night in Cai Be.

IMG_2200

IMG_2213

IMG_2201

Our first stop is a local village with several family businesses. Here, for example, they make coconut candy by boiling coconut milk with sugar and sometimes flavour additives like coffee and chocolate. Coconuts, by the way, are used very extensively here – pulp and milk are used for food, and the shell is used as fuel, for crafts or even for activated charcoal production.

IMG_2215

IMG_2220

IMG_2219

And here there’s clearly a rice business. A woman is making edible rice paper on a brazier. Not far away, rice alcohol is being produced and there are big jars of alcohol infused on bananas, lychees and even venomous snakes. Rice is also used for making pictures – every rice grain gets painted in the appropriate colour and used for the kind of mosaic as in one of the pictures below.

IMG_2224

IMG_2221

IMG_2222

IMG_2225

And a little bit further they are making puffed rice, frying it on a hot pan with hot black sand. Further on, this rice is mixed with various additives – sugar, salt or ginger, and even pieces of pork or beef – and pressed into something similar to the rice cakes that we know.

I have to say, all these braziers and pans make me feel like in hell in this not-very-cool weather, I sweat a ton, but finally we are sat under fans for a cup of jasmine tea with different sweets made of banana, ginger, sesame and peanuts. Jasmine tea here is very special, much more fragrant than, say, in China or elsewhere. Phuoc explains this by a higher proportion of jasmine flowers relative to tea. Enjoying the tea, we look around and notice that they sell all sorts of things here – coconut oil, crafts made of coconut and other trees, some ointment with cobra venom and even the famous Tiger Balm, although not in the familiar little red tin.

IMG_2214

After the tea break, we again board the boat and drive on to the An Binh island, where we are supposed to enjoy fresh fruit and local music. Just as we take a step off the boat and onto the ground, we immediately feel knocked down by the smell of durian, and in a minute, we understand why: right in front of us there are durian trees, laden with large “fragrant” fruits.

IMG_2253

Fortunately, we aren’t offered any, instead on our plate we have pieces of ordinary watermelon, exotic but familiar pineapple and mango and quite unusual guava (something like feijoa and, as it turned out, closely related to it) and jackfruit (similar to durian, a bit smelly too, but, oddly enough, belongs to the mulberry family, and the pulp is bright orange, slippery and sugary-sweet, tasting like either melon or bubble-gum). At the same time, several performers entertain us with Vietnamese songs accompanied by guitar and some kind of folk instrument, and even with small performances.

The next item on our schedule is a ride on a traditional flat-bottomed rowing boat along a narrow canal. There are cork trees growing right in the water, which, according to Phuoc, protect the soil from erosion. Generally all the vegetation around is pretty luxuriant, often covered with unfamiliar fruits. Behind the plants one can see houses on stilts. Some of them look better – obviously, the owners are making good money by growing durians – and some are pretty shabby. And yet, as I already said above, there is a particular charm to all of this, especially when you pass by a house where a nice-looking middle-aged lady is sweeping her terrace to the sound of some Vietnamese song playing at full blast.

IMG_2286

Not counting the Vietnamese song, there is a peaceful silence around, broken only by the splash of water under the oars and by boats occasionally passing by.

IMG_2282

Meanwhile, the helmsman on our sampan is already waiting with young coconuts for us. Once again, so far we are very impressed with our tour, everything seems to be arranged at the highest level! And so, sipping refreshing coconut water, we headed back to the island, moored and walked to an eco-tourism complex with an orchard, where we were served lunch. The lunch was home-cooked and pretty tasty, consisting of fish that had to be wrapped with vegetables in rice paper and dipped into fish sauce, deep-fried spring rolls, grilled shrimps, vegetable soup (we liked it the least) and pork with rice. Fish sauce, I must say, is an extremely smelly substance, but it tastes a lot better than it smells. Phuoc said that the Vietnamese fish sauce is much better than the Thai one, because it is made of anchovies, while in Thailand it’s made of mackerel.

IMG_2298

We washed it all down with Vietnamese coffee, stronger than many varieties of coffee, but less strong than Turkish coffee. That’s when Phuoc told us that the tradition of drinking coffee is a French colonial heritage, as well as colonial architecture and baguettes, and this, in her opinion apparently shared by many Vietnamese, exhausts the list of positive effects of colonisation, absolutely not offsetting the complete plundering of royal treasures.

We also starting talking about the Vietnam War – how Saigon was much more developed, more or less in step with Singapore and Hong Kong, and then, destroyed by the war and the communist regime, fell hopelessly behind – and about relations with China, which are much better than in the 80s, but, according to Phuoc, quite dangerous and could potentially lead to the occupation of Vietnam by China.

Actually, we went into these lengthy conversations for one simple reason: while we were having lunch (luckily, under a canopy), a heavy downpour started. I have to say that we’d been lucky with the rain from the very beginning – all weather websites I know were forecasting it right in the morning and for the whole day. And it only started when we’d already finished sightseeing.

IMG_2301

After lunch, the only thing left was a boat ride to the town of Vinh Long, where our driver should have already been waiting for us. The rain kept pouring. Fortunately, the boat also had a canopy (unlike the flat rowing boat we were on literally a couple of hours ago), but at some point a wind broke out forcing us to put on raincoats so as not to get wet. Because of the rain, we didn’t stop at the Vinh Long market, and headed straight to the pier. As there were only a few metres remaining to the pier, the waves became so strong, making the boat reel so much that I seriously feared that it would scoop up water and capsize. But thank God, it didn’t, and we drove off back to Ho Chi Minh City. The rain was pouring non-stop throughout the whole two-and-a-half-hour drive, but not as intensely as before.

Today we decided to have dinner at the Ngon restaurant, recommended by Phuoc, which turned out to be a good choice. The restaurant is a ten minute walk from our hotel and is located in that fancier area we didn’t reach yesterday. The interior is very pretty with palm trees everywhere. The menu has several sections: Japanese, Thai, Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese, and of course we went for the latter – aren’t we in Vietnam after all? I had bun bo hue (spicy beef soup with rice vermicelli and greens – more precisely, it is the chili pepper served separately that makes it spicy), chicken thighs barbecue and for dessert, something like banana cake with coconut milk – not sweet at all, which I really liked. Generally, I’m enjoying the Vietnamese cuisine and finding it somewhat less intrusive compared to, say, Chinese (which I like as well but tend to have had enough of soon) – mainly because dishes taste precisely like their ingredients and all sorts of sauces and spices are served separately: you can add/dip/sprinkle if you want, but you don’t have to. It all cost us twice as much as yesterday’s dinner (almost 30 USD) – it’s a fancy restaurant after all, but we also ate a lot more.

20170606_192640

Вьетнам – День 2

CLICK HERE FOR ENGLISH VERSION. АНГЛОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ.

6 июня 2017

Пускай я неоригинальна и повторяю то, что уже говорила однажды, но скажу еще раз: в азиатских отелях завтраки особенно радуют тем, что помимо обыденных поднадоевших сыров/колбас/круассанов/тостов можно угоститься стир-фраем из овощей, лапшичкой, димсамчиками, и даже супом фо! Именно это мы и проделали, перед тем как спуститься к 8 утра на ресепшен, где нас уже поджидала наша давешняя гид Фы для экскурсии к дельте Меконга.

20170607_073939

Для начала нам предстояла двухчасовая поездка на комфортабельном джипе до городка Кай Бе к дельте Меконга. Пока мы выезжали из Хошимина, да и потом, я думала о своих впечатлениях об окружающих местах. Вот бывают места, про которые говоришь: “красиво, аж дух захватывает”. Это не тот случай. К Вьетнаму, который мы пока что видели, лучше всего подходит эпитет “очаровательный”. Причем он очарователен во многом именно своим несовершенством, включая хаос на дорогах, нагромождение узких домов шириной в одно окно, порой обшарпанных, уличных торговцев на тротуарах, и так далее.

По дороге Фы рассказывала нам о том, как живут люди в стране – о низких зарплатах, о налогах и случаях уклонения от них, о том, как со становлением свободной рыночной экономики в стране многие стремятся заниматься бизнесом, пусть и мелким, и что работать в семьях часто вынуждены все, включая стариков, так как иначе очень трудно сводить концы с концами.

В какой-то момент речь зашла о собаках и о том, что на севере Вьетнама их до сих пор едят, несмотря на попытки правительства с этим бороться. В 1945 году в стране свирепствовал страшный голод, и именно собаки (не по своей воле, так сказать!) помогли многим людям выжить, поэтому некоторые до сих пор считают, что есть собаку – на счастье. Собственно, это не мешает вьетнамцам считать собаку другом человека и даже привечать бродячих собак в своих магазинах или кафе – оказывается, собачий лай звучит похоже на вьетнамское слово, означающее богатство, поэтому считается, что собаки опять-таки приносят удачу (даже если их и не есть). А вот с кошками дело обстоит с точностью до наоборот, потому что их “мяу” созвучно со словом, означающим бедность.

IMG_2293

По дороге мы остановились для посещения “счастливой комнаты” (именно такой эвфемизм тут используется для туалета, что для путешественников вполне логично) в каком-то интересном месте, представляющим собой не то сад, не то ресторан. Стараниями Фы остановка превратилась для нас в нечто вроде лекции по ботанике: она показала нам буквально каждое растение и объяснила, как и для чего оно используется. Возникло ощущение, что вьетнамцы едят практически любые стебли, листья, плоды и корни (ну кроме ядовитых), в том числе и стебли бананового дерева, и практически все части лотоса. Потом, уже в машине, она дала нам посмотреть книжки про тропические растения, цветы и фрукты.

IMG_2183

Еще минут пятнадцать езды на машине – и мы доехали до Кай Бе, где нам предстояло пересесть на лодку и продолжить путешествие на ней. Лодка была большая – наподобие сампана – человек на 10, но рассчитана она была только на нашу мини-группку. Первым долгом мы отправились смотреть знаменитый плавучий рынок фруктов и овощей. Население в дельте Меконга в основном занимается фермерством, и выращивать фрукты довольно прибыльно. Местный климат и плодородная земля этому только способствуют. А вот рис, например, выращивать не слишком выгодно – рыночная цена одной тонны едва покрывает труд рабочих, задействованных в производстве этой самой тонны. Возвращаясь к нашему плавучему рынку, нам объяснили, что особенно много лодок с товаром тут бывает рано утром, а к 10 утра (время, когда на рынке оказались мы), все уже распродается и остаются считанные лодки. То есть для того, чтобы увидеть плавучий рынок во всей красе, мы должны были переночевать в Кай Бе.

IMG_2200

IMG_2213

IMG_2201

Наша первая остановка – местная деревушка с несколькими семейными предприятиями. Здесь, например, производят кокосовые ириски – уваривают кокосовое молоко с сахаром и иногда вкусовыми добавками вроде кофе и шоколада. Кокосы, кстати, тут используются очень активно – мякоть и молоко употребляют в пищу, а скорлупу используют в виде топлива, делают из нее поделки и даже производят из нее активированный уголь.

IMG_2215

IMG_2220

IMG_2219

А вот тут готовят из риса. Женщина готовит на жаровне съедобную рисовую бумагу. Неподалеку гонится рисовая водка и стоят большие баллоны с настойками на бананах, личи и даже ядовитых змеях. Из риса же делают картины – каждую рисинку окрашивают в нужный цвет и составляют мозаику как на одном из фото внизу.

IMG_2224

IMG_2221

IMG_2222

IMG_2225

Чуть дальше из риса же делают эдакий поприс (по аналогии с попкорном, воздушный рис то бишь), обжаривая его на раскаленной жаровне с горячим песком. Далее этот рис смешивают с разными добавками – сахаром, солью либо имбирем, а то и кусочками свинины или говядины и спрессовывают в нечто похожее на знакомые нам рисовые хлебцы.

Надо сказать, от всех этих жаровень в эту и без того не слишком прохладную погоду чувствуешь себя как в аду, по крайней мере с меня сходит семь потов, но вот уже нас усаживают под вентиляторы пить жасминовый чай с разными сладостями из банана, имбиря, кунжута и арахиса. Жасминовый чай тут какой-то особенный, гораздо более ароматный, чем например в Китае или где-либо еще. Фы объясняет это более высокой пропорцией цветков жасмина по отношению к чаю. Сидя за чаем, мы осматриваемся и видим, что тут продают всякую всячину – и кокосовое масло, и поделки из кокосовой пальмы и других деревьев, и мазь из яда кобры, и даже известную нам “вьетнамскую” мазь, правда не в привычной красной жестяночке.

IMG_2214

Насладившись чайной паузой, мы снова садимся на лодку и едем дальше, на остров Ан Бинь, где нам предстоит угоститься свежими фруктами и местной музыкой. Лишь сделав шаг из лодки на землю, уже чувствуешь, как тебя сражает наповал запах дуриана, и через минуту понимаешь почему: прямо перед нами дуриановые деревья, увешанные крупными “ароматными” плодами.

IMG_2253

К счастью, их нам отведать не предлагают, вместо них на тарелке обыкновенный арбуз, экзотичные, но привычные ананас и манго и совсем непривычные гуава (чем-то напоминает фейхоа и, как выяснилось, является его близкой родственницей) и джекфрут (похож на дуриан, тоже пованивает, но относится, как ни странно, к семейству тутовых, а мякоть – ярко-оранжевая, скользкая и приторно-сладкая, напоминая по вкусу то ли дыню, то ли жвачку “Турбо”). Прямо тут же нам поют вьетнамские песни под аккомпанемент гитары и какого-то народного инструмента и даже разыгрывают небольшие представления.

Следующий пункт нашей программы – это прогулка на традиционной плоскодонной весельной лодке по узкому каналу. Прямо в канале растут пробковые деревья, которые по словам Фы, защищают почву от эрозии. Вокруг вообще буйная растительность, нередко увешанная неведомыми плодами. За растительностью виднеются домики на сваях. Некоторые из них получше – очевидно владельцы хорошо наживаются на выращивании дурианов – а некоторые довольно обшарпанные. И всё-таки, как я уже сказала выше, в этом чувствуется своя прелесть и свое очарование, особенно когда проезжаешь какой-нибудь домик, где под звуки какой-то вьетнамской песни, включенной на полную катушку, милая тетушка подметает террасу.

IMG_2286

Не считая вьетнамской песни, вокруг стоит умиротворяющая тишина, нарушаемая лишь плеском воды под веслами и изредка проезжающими мимо лодками.

IMG_2282

Тем временем, на нашем сампане нас уже дожидаются с молодыми кокосами для нас. Всё-таки, пока что мы очень довольны нашим туром, все на высшем уровне! Так, потягивая освежающую кокосовую воду, мы поплыли опять к острову, пришвартовались и отправились в экотуристический комплекс с фруктовым садом, где нам подали обед. Обед был домашний и в целом вкусный, и состоял из рыбы, которую надо было заворачивать с овощами в рисовую бумагу и обмакивать в рыбный же соус, спринг-роллов, печеных креветок, овощного супа (как раз суп понравился меньше всего) и свинины с рисом. Рыбный соус, надо сказать, штука на редкость вонючая, но на вкус довольно неплохая. Фы сказала, что вьетнамский рыбный соус намного лучше тайского, так как производится из анчоусов, тогда как в Таиланде – из макрели.

IMG_2298

Запили обед вьетнамским кофе, более крепким, чем многие разновидности кофе, но менее крепким, чем турецкий. Тут же Фы рассказала нам, что традиция пить кофе – это французское колониальное наследие, так же как колониальная архитектура и багеты, и этим, по ее мнению, разделяемом, очевидно, многими вьетнамцами, положительные эффекты колонизации исчерпываются и абсолютно не уравновешивают например, полное разграбление дворцовых артефактов.

Также заговорили и о Вьетнамской войне – Сайгон до войны был гораздо более развитым и шел практически в ногу с Сингапуром и Гонконгом, а далее, разрушенный войной и коммунистическим режимом, безнадежно отстал – и об отношениях с Китаем, гораздо лучших, чем в 80-е, но, по мнению Фы, довольно опасных и потенциально могущих привести к оккупации Вьетнама Китаем.

Собственно, пустились в эти пространные разговоры мы по одной простой причине: пока мы сидели за обедом (к счастью, под навесом), полил страшный ливень. Но вообще, надо сказать, с дождем повезло – прогноз обещал его еще с утра и на весь день. А он пошел только сейчас, когда мы уже закончили все осматривать.

IMG_2301

После обеда нам оставалось еще только прокатиться на лодке до города Винь Лонг, где нас уже должен был поджидать шофер. А дождь все лил и лил. Лодка, по счастью, была тоже прикрыта навесом (в отличие от плоскодонки, на которой мы катались буквально пару часов назад), но в какой-то момент задул ветер и нам пришлось надеть дождевики, чтобы не промокнуть. Из-за дождя же мы не остановились на рынке Винь Лонга, а поехали прямо к причалу. В какой-то момент, когда до причала оставались считанные метры, на реке были такие волны и лодку так шатало, что я всерьез опасалась, как бы она не зачерпнула воды и не перевернулась. Но слава богу, обошлось, и мы поехали обратно в Хошимин, и на протяжении всех двух с половиной часов поездки не переставая лил дождь, правда уже не так интенсивно.

Сегодня мы решили поужинать в рекомендованном Фы ресторане Ngon, и не ошиблись. Ресторан в десяти минутах хода от отеля и находится как раз в том чуть более фешенебельном районе, куда мы не попали вчера. Интерьер очень красивый, везде пальмы. В меню несколько разделов: японский, тайский, китайский, корейский и вьетнамский, и мы, конечно, остановились на последнем – в конце концов, во Вьетнаме мы или где? Я ела суп бун бо хюэ (острый суп с рисовой вермишелью, зеленью и говядиной – точнее острым его делает перец чили, который подается отдельно), барбекю из куриных бедрышек и на десерт, что-то из банана с кокосовым молоком – абсолютно не сладкое, что мне весьма понравилось. Вообще, вьетнамская кухня мне пока нравится и кажется менее навязчивой, чем, к примеру, китайская (которая тоже нравится, впрочем, но имеет тенденцию надоедать) – главным образом, тем, что блюда на вкус как составляющие их ингредиенты, а всякие соусы и пряности часто подаются отдельно: хочешь – добавляй/обмакивай/посыпай, а не хочешь – ешь так. Обошлось нам все это удовольствие вдвое дороже, чем вчера (почти в 30 долларов США) – всё-таки классный ресторан, но мы и съели намного больше.

20170606_192640

Вьетнам – День 1

CLICK HERE FOR ENGLISH VERSION. АНГЛОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ.

5 июня 2017

Вьетнамское путешествие началось еще вчера вечером, когда мы отправились из Баку в Доху, а из последней, после 2-часовой состыковки – прямиком в Хошимин. Рейс, хоть и долгий, мы перенесли хорошо, во многом потому что он ночной: пришли, сели, заснули, проснулись – а тут уже тебя бранчем кормят, и каких-то два часа осталось.

Вообще, все обошлось без накладок, правда получение визы заняло немало времени. Сначала пришлось заполнять длиннющую форму, расспрашивающую обо всем что можно, включая религию и информацию о членах семьи. Потом мы сдали документы в окошечко и нас посадили ждать. И ждать. И еще раз ждать. В целом ожидание не заняло и часа, но показалось целой вечностью.

Мы опасались, что представители турагентства нас не дождутся, но очевидно они осведомлены о скорости процесса выдачи виз, поэтому, конечно, наши опасения оказались напрасны – нас встретила милая девушка по имени Фы, села вместе с нами в кондиционированную машину и повезла в офис агентства для окончательной оплаты. По дороге она нам показала несколько карточек с простейшими фразами на вьетнамском, и рассказала про историю Хошимина и то, как он только в 70-е годы стал называться так, ибо прежнее его название – Сайгон – уж больно ассоциировалось с вьетнамской войной. Кстати, само название “Сайгон” – это, по ее словам, видоизмененная форма старого кхмерского “Прей-Нокор” (да-да, не удивляйтесь!), являющегося названием города в его довьетнамские (то бишь камбоджийские) времена.

IMG_2171

Офис оказался небольшой комнаткой с парой компьютеров, заставленной какими-то коробками и пропахшей почему-то нафталином, где нас очень приветливо встретили, угостили холодным чаем, вручили какую-то допотопную “Нокию” с местной симкой для связи с ними, ну и, само собой, взяли с нас деньги. Вообще пока что ощущение, что агенство с нами очень носится, едва ли пылинки не сдувает!

Затем нас привезли в нашу гостиницу Lavender Boutique Hotel, где и оставили – на сегодня больше ничего не запланировано и вечер у нас свободный. Так что освежившись и приведя себя в порядок, мы отправились на разведку окрестностей и на ужин. Сразу выйдя на улицу, как будто попали в баню – температура воздуха около тридцати градусов и очень влажно. Растительность вокруг весьма тропическая – много зелени, пальмы и т. д.

Перемещаться пешком по улицам – дело тут очень и очень непростое. Во-первых, надо учесть сумасшедшее движение: основная масса ездоков тут не за рулем автомобиля, а на мотороллере, и последних просто бесчисленное множество. И если автомобилисты еще как-то соблюдают правила дорожного движения – то бишь останавливаются на красный свет и пропускают пешеходов на “зебре” – то от мотоциклистов подобного ожидать не приходится, посему приходится лавировать между ними буквально с риском для жизни! Они даже на тротуарах ездят! Во-вторых, на самих тротуарах плитка положена как попало – прямо бальзам на наши бакинские души! – и дороги очень неровные. Ну и в-третьих, и без того не слишком широкие тротуары заставлены чем попало: припаркованными мотоциклами, низкими стульчиками с сидящими на них людьми, лотками с уличной едой и фруктами. Причем весьма специфические ароматы источают и еда, и фрукты, ибо среди последних уверенно доминирует дуриан с его неповторимым запахом, и он тут на каждом шагу!

IMG_2176

IMG_2181

IMG_2178

Среди всего этого негламурного бардака мы обнаруживаем какую-то симпатичную едальню, в которой, как видно в окно, сидят в основном вьетнамцы, но местами и иностранцы, что мы воспринимаем как хороший знак: место, стало быть, не туристическое, но и не черт-те какая забегаловка. Отведали местного пива, напитка из алоэ вера с семенами чиа и рисовой лапшички со свининой, огурцами, арахисом и чем-то еще, и всё понравилось. Причем обошлось нам это все меньше чем в 15 долларов США на двоих!

20170605_181240

После ужина попытались было прогуляться до реки Сайгон, которая должна быть неподалеку, но не тут-то было: хлынул жуткий ливень и не прекращался наверное полчаса. Наши сингапурские дождевики, предусмотрительно прихваченные с собой, пришлись кстати, но не сильно помогли – всё равно приходилось пережидать под козырьками зданий каждый раз, когда ливень усиливался (то есть каждые 5 минут), пока мы наконец не промочили ноги настолько, что решили повернуть обратно, буквально немного не дойдя до несколько более фешенебельного района чем наш. Народ тут явно к ливням приученный, тем более, что сейчас как раз сезон дождей – у всех дождевики, огромные зонты, даже мотоциклы прикрыты непромокаемыми чехлами. Пока пережидали, кстати, зашли в какой-то торговый центр с одеждой, где аж пахло ширпотребом – кого-кого, а нас, видевших бакинские “толкучки” в подземных переходах, таким зрелищем не удивишь.

20170605_192715

20170605_192759

В общем, первые впечатления о городе: очень колоритный, гораздо беднее, чем ранее виденные азиатские города (такие как Сингапур или Гонконг или Шанхай), везде снуют мотороллеры и пахнет дурианом.

20170605_193304

Vietnam – Day 1

РУССКОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ. CLICK HERE FOR RUSSIAN VERSION.

5 June 2017

Our Vietnamese trip began last night, when we left Baku for Doha and from the latter, after a 2-hour connection, flew straight to Ho Chi Minh city. The flight, albeit a long one, felt okay, in many respects due to being an overnight one: we literally got on, sat down, went to sleep, woke up – and suddenly it was already brunch time with just two hours remaining.

In general, everything went pretty smoothly, even though getting the visa took ages. First, we had to fill out a long form asking about everything one could possibly ask about, including religion and information about family members. Then we handed the documents to the officer and were asked to wait. And wait. And wait again. In total, the waiting time was less than an hour, but it felt like eternity.

We were anxious that the travel agency representatives wouldn’t wait for us, but obviously they were aware of the speed of the visa issuing process, so of course, our fears were groundless – we were greeted by a nice lady called Phuoc, picked up by an air-conditioned car and taken to the travel agency office to settle the outstanding payment balance. On the way, she showed us some flashcards with basic phrases in Vietnamese and told us about the history of Ho Chi Minh city and how it was only in the 1970’s when it was called so, because its previous name, Saigon, was too reminiscent of the Vietnam war. By the way, the name Saigon, as per Phuoc, is the modified form of the old Khmer “Prey Nokor” (yes, yes, don’t be surprised!), which used to be the name of the city in its pre-Vietnamese (i.e. Cambodian) times.

IMG_2171

The office turned out to be a small room with a couple of computers, piled with boxes and smelling of mothballs for some reason, where we were warmly welcomed, served iced tea, handed an ancient Nokia with a local sim-card to stay in touch with them, and, of course, charged the outstanding payment. Overall, for the time being, it feels like the agency is taking good care of us!

Then we were brought to the Lavender Boutique Hotel, where they left us – nothing is planned for today and we have the evening free. So after freshening up, we went out to explore the surroundings and get some dinner. The moment we stepped out into the street, we felt like in a bath – the air temperature is about 30 degrees Celsius and it’s very humid. The vegetation around is quite tropical with lots of greenery, palm trees, etc.

Walking around proves to be very, very difficult. Firstly, one must take into account the crazy traffic: most people here don’t drive a car, but a scooter, which there are lots and lots of. And if car-owners at least follow some traffic rules – that is, stop at the red light and before zebra crossings – you can’t expect the same from motorcyclists, so you have to manoeuvre between them literally risking your life! They even drive on sidewalks! Secondly, the sidewalks themselves are tiled pretty badly – chicken soup to our Bakuvian souls! – and are very uneven. And thirdly, the sidewalks, which aren’t very wide anyway, are clogged up with all sort of things: parked motorcycles, low stools with people sitting on them, street food and fruit stalls. And very specific scents are exuded both by the food and the fruit, as among the latter, durian dominates confidently with its unique smell, and it is at every corner!

IMG_2176

IMG_2181

IMG_2178

Among all this unglamorous disorder, we discover a nice-looking restaurant, where, as we can see through the window, most customers are Vietnamese but there are some foreigners too, which we perceive as a good sign: the place is, therefore, not very touristy, but still foreigner-friendly. We tried local beer, some drink made of aloe vera with chia seeds and rice noodles with pork, cucumbers, peanuts and something else, and everything was tasty. And it all cost us less than 15 USD for two!

20170605_181240

After dinner we tried to walk to the Saigon River, which was supposed to be nearby, but had to give up as a terrible shower started pouring and didn’t stop for a good half an hour. Our Singapore raincoats, which we’d prudently taken with us, came in handy, but didn’t help much – we still had to wait under canopies every time the rain intensified (that is every 5 minutes), until we finally got our feet so wet that we decided to turn back, almost making it to a fancier-looking area than ours. The people here are obviously accustomed to downpours, especially since now it’s the rainy season – everyone has raincoats, huge umbrellas, even scooters are covered with waterproof covers. While waiting, by the way, we walked into a shopping centre selling clothes, which even smelled of cheap clothes – not a sight that can surprise us, who had seen the Baku street markets in underground passages.

20170605_192715

20170605_192759

So here are my first impressions of the city: very colourful, much poorer than the previously seen Asian cities (such as Singapore or Hong Kong or Shanghai), scooters swarming all around and everywhere smells of durian.

20170605_193304

Georgia – Day 2

РУССКОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ. CLICK HERE FOR RUSSIAN VERSION.

27 December 2014

We dedicated our second day to a tour of Tbilisi. First of all, we were taken to the Turtle lake which is located in the posh Vake district. The lake is called like that for a very obvious reason – there are small turtles on its shores. The lake was coated with a thin layer of ice, and the park impressed us with its clean pine air and the sources thereof.

Yesterday we thought that Tbilisi was pretty small, but when we were taken to see it from one of the highest points today, so that not only the old part, but also the new districts were visible, it turned out that the sizes are much larger and the city, extended in length, lies in the cleft between the mountains. In short, the size of the city could be seen well, but the details could not really be made out – it was very foggy. On the way to this lookout point we saw a very original building of the 112 rescue service in the form of a flying saucer.

20141228_120721
One of the planned visits was the Pantheon – the burial place of famous Georgian figures of culture, science and politics – situated on the slopes of Mount Mtatsminda. More precisely, it was our guide who told us about the Pantheon, as we only knew about the graves of Griboyedov and his wife, Nina Chavchavadze. It turns out that these very graves initiated the Pantheon. We came as close as we could by car, and then had to walk, making pretty steep climbs. The guide was encouraging us by showing the place of destination. From this high point, we looked at Tbilisi again, from a different perspective now, and suddenly it turned out that the grave of Griboyedov was just behind us. The grave had a very touching monument to a weeping woman clinging to a cross, and a no less touching famous inscription: “Your spirit and achievements will be remembered forever. Why still does my love outlive you?” With regard to the Pantheon itself, I found all the graves interesting, even though I had only known the names of Stalin’s mother, Zviad Gamsakhurdia and Nodar Dumbadze.

20141228_121124

20141228_121322
After such a spiritual visit we moved on to a purely prosaic activity – food consumption, for the purpose of which we were taken to the Agmashenebeli avenue (former Plekhanov street). By the way, I really liked the avenue, even more than the Rustaveli ave. I can’t now recall the name of the small restaurant we went to, but the interior was purely Georgian, with antique items, such as cameras and phonographs, and reproductions of Pirosmani’s paintings on the walls (we ate our khachapuris right next to the famous “Feast of Five Princes”).

If yesterday we visited ancient churches and temples, today, having driven us through a quarter that was very reminiscent of the Kubinka and generally the area of Teze Bazar in Baku, Zviad brought us to a modern temple, visible from almost any point of Tbilisi – Tsminda Sameba, the Holy Trinity Cathedral. It occupies a large area, around which you can still see construction works, like columns being built and stone carving works going on.

20141228_140522
Apparently, the plan of our guide consisted of alternating spiritual visits with pure entertainment – undoubtedly the cableway to the Narikala forthress at the same Mount Mtatsminda was part of the latter. It is not at all scary here – unlike the one I took to the Great Wall in China, where you literally float over the abyss, risking dropping your shoes there (while also afraid to drop yourself!). Here you just sit in a closed cabin for 5-6 people and peacefully look at the Kura and its banks underneath. We didn’t get to see the fortress, but had the opportunity to be photographed with a falcon, and then descended to the Europe Square using the same cableway. We saw a few people dressed as Santa Clauses riding bicycles, and also something that made me really emotional – street vendors of roasted peanuts and sunflower seeds, which are measured with a large or a small faceted glass and then sold in paper cornets: where are the days when we had the exact same thing in Baku?..

20141228_145438

20141228_143903

20141228_144909

20141228_150224

20141228_150422
Both today and yesterday we saw a lot of purely Tbilisian houses, clinging on the steep cliffs over the Kura, with a lot of balconies. Today we also went into one of the old quarters. Here we found the famous sulfur baths, which we could sense even from afar for the very specific smell of hydrogen sulphide. We walked up to a waterfall in a narrow crevice.

20141228_151501

20141228_152154

20141228_151855
Ever since yesterday we really wanted to buy churchkhela – the traditional sausage-shaped candy made of grape must with nuts, but Zviad had told us not to buy it not just anywhere but in trusted places, and so he took us to one. The tiny convenience store seemed to have a whole market squeezed in it: they had meat, and cheese, and pickles, and a variety of fruit-vegetables, and well, of course, the coveted churchkhela. Unluckily, we had to wait for the sales assistant of this particular department for quite a while – it turned out that he had been queueing at a supermarket nearby to buy a box of champagne.

Towards the end of the day we went up the Mtatsminda for the third time, this time by a cable car. The first stop was near the pantheon we’d already seen, and the second one led us to a large park, with lots of swings and carousels, with New Year’s songs coming from the speakers, with a house with upturned balconies – as if it was standing upside down. And again I was wrapped in nostalgia – the Baku Boulevard in the days of my childhood looked exactly like this, even the benches were similar. But it’s not that I’m trying to say that anything around looks old and shabby, straight from those times – the park is exactly maintained like this, just as the buildings are restored, as I said before.

20141228_165328
Overflowing with impressions, we ended the day in the khinkali restaurant right near the hotel, where we tried different kinds of khinkali: with meat, mushrooms, cheese – and were very pleased. Thus, our stay in Tbilisi was brief, but very impressive.

Грузия – День 2

CLICK HERE FOR ENGLISH VERSION. АНГЛОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ.

28 Декабря 2014

Второй день мы посвятили объезду Тбилиси. Прежде всего нас повезли к Черепашьему озеру- это престижный парковый район Ваке. Озеро называется Черепашьим по самой очевидной причине – на берегах его водятся черепахи, не галапагосские, конечно, а так, небольшие. Озеро было подернуто ледяной пленкой, а сам парк впечатлил своим чистым сосновым воздухом и самими источниками оного.

Вчера нам показалось, что Тбилиси очень небольшой, но когда нас сегодня повезли смотреть на него с одной из высоких точек, так, чтобы была видна не только старая часть, но и новые микрорайоны, оказалось, что размеры значительно больше – город вытянут в длину и лежит в расщелине между гор. Размеры города, короче, были видны хорошо, а вот детали просматривались не слишком – было очень туманно. По пути на эту смотровую точку видели очень оригинальное здание службы спасения 112 в форме летающей тарелки.

20141228_120721
Одним из запланированных посещений был пантеон – место захоронения известных деятелей грузинской культуры, науки и политики, расположенное на склоне горы Мтацминда. Точнее, про Пантеон нам рассказал наш гид, а мы знали лишь о нахождении там могил Грибоедова и его жены Нины Чавчавадзе. Оказывается, именно они положили начало этому пантеону. Мы подъехали на машине до тех пор, пока можно было, а дальше шли пешком, преодолевая довольно крутые подъемы. Гид ободрял и показывал, куда мы должны прийти. С этой высокой точки мы опять посмотрели на Тбилиси, уже в другом ракурсе, и неожиданно оказалось, что могилы Грибоедовых как раз у нас за спиной. На могиле Грибоедова – трогательный памятник женщине, плачущей у креста, и не менее трогательная знаменитая надпись: «Ум и дела твои бессмертны в памяти русской, но для чего пережила тебя любовь моя?» Что касается самого пантеона, я с интересом посмотрела на все памятники, но известными мне были только имена матери Сталина, Звиада Гамсахурдиа и Нодара Думбадзе.

20141228_121124

20141228_121322
После столь возвышенного посещения мы перешли к мероприятию сугубо прозаичному – поглощению пищи. Перекусить нас отвезли на проспект Агмашенебели (бывшая улица Плеханова). Кстати, проспект очень понравился, пожалуй даже больше, чем Руставели. Название небольшого ресторанчика в памяти не отложилось, но интерьер был сугубо грузинским, по стенам были развешаны антикварные вещи (фотоаппарат, граммофон) и репродукции картин Пиросмани (мы лично поедали хачапури под знаменитыми «Пирующими князьями»).

Если вчера мы посещали церкви и храмы старинные, то сегодня, провезя нас через квартал, очень напоминающий бакинскую Кубинку и вообще район Тязя Базара, Звиад показал нам храм-новодел, видный едва ли не со всех точек Тбилиси – это Цминда Самеба, храм Святой Троицы. Он занимает большую территорию, на которой все еще ведутся какие-то строительные работы – строятся колонны, делается резьба по камню.

20141228_140522
Очевидно, в планах нашего гида было попеременно угощать нас то возвышенными достопримечательностями, то чисто развлекательными – несомненно, канатная дорога к крепости Нарикала на все той же горе Мтацминда относится к последним. Она здесь совсем не страшная – не то, что на Великой Китайской Стене, где, проплывая в креслице над бездной, все время рискуешь уронить в нее туфлю (и опасаешься уронить туда же себя). Тут ты чинно сидишь в закрытой кабинке на 5-6 человек и мирно поглядываешь на Куру и ее берега под тобой. Никакую крепость нам показывать не стали, зато мы имели возможность сфотографироваться с соколом, после чего довольно быстро тем же путем спустились обратно на площадь Европы. На площади какие-то люди в костюмах Дедов Морозов катались на велосипедах, а что умилило едва ли не до слез – так это уличная торговля жареным арахисом и семечками, которые отмеряют большим или маленьким граненым стаканом и пересыпают в бумажные фунтики: все это когда-то было и в Баку…

20141228_145438

20141228_143903

20141228_144909

20141228_150224

20141228_150422
И вчера, и сегодня мы уже достаточно видели чисто тбилисские дома, лепящиеся на отвесных скалах над Курой со множеством балкончиков. Но сегодня мы углубились в один из старых кварталов. Здесь оказались знаменитые бани на серных источниках, которые мы почуяли еще издалека по весьма характерному запаху сероводорода. Мы прогулялись к водопаду, находящемуся в узкой расщелине.

20141228_151501

20141228_152154

20141228_151855
Нам еще вчера хотелось купить чурчхелу – традиционную виноградную колбаску, начиненную орехами, но Звиад сказал, что покупать надо не абы где, а в проверенных местах, и следующим номером как раз повез нас в оное. В крохотной колоритной лавочке помещался целый базар: тут и мясо, и сыры, и соленья, и разнообразные фрукты-овощи, ну, и конечно, вожделенная чурчхела. Правда, продавца именно этого отдела пришлось ждать довольно долго – выяснилось, что он стоял в очереди в супермаркете неподалеку, закупая ящик шампанского.

К исходу дня мы оказались на Мтацминде в третий раз, теперь поднявшись на нее на фуникулере. Первая остановка была около уже виденного нами пантеона, а вторая привела нас в большой парк, со множеством качелей и каруселей, с новогодними песнями, доносящимися из динамиков, с домиком с перевернутыми балконами – как бы вниз головой. И снова меня окутала ностальгия – бакинский бульвар во времена моего детства выглядел именно так, даже скамейки были похожи. Причем я вовсе не хочу сказать, что что-либо вокруг выглядит дряхлым и обшарпанным, прямиком из тех времен – парк именно поддерживается в таком виде, так же как реставрируются здания, о чем я уже говорила раньше.

20141228_165328
Переполненные впечатлениями, мы закончили день в хинкальной прямо около гостинице. Попробовали разные хинкали: с мясом, грибами, сыром – и остались весьма довольны. Таким образом, наше пребывание в Тбилиси было кратким, но очень впечатляющим.

Post Navigation