Travelling Leila

My impressions about the places I visit

Archive for the month “June, 2014”

Food in Singapore (bonus post)

РУССКОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ. CLICK HERE FOR RUSSIAN VERSION.

If you have read my previous posts about Singapore, you might remember that I was mentioning the idea to write a separate gastronomic one, where I would describe the stuff I’d been eating during the trip (and other stuff which I had only seen but not necessarily eaten). Those who enjoy food as much as I do will hopefully appreciate.

So, on our first day in Singapore we ended up at the Paragon shopping mall, which, as pretty much everywhere here, had an extensive food court. It seemed logical to actually start the acquaintance with the food in Singapore with a Singaporean cuisine restaurant. There was one here – the Grandma’s restaurant was proudly proclaiming its authenticity.

IMG_1501

The Singaporean cuisine is represented by a large variety of dishes of different origins, which is not a bit surprising given such a diverse ethnic composition of the population. The whole concept of the “Singaporean cuisine” is a kind of mix of Chinese and Malay/Indonesian cuisines, with influences from other Asian and even European cuisines.

The very first thing I ordered was fried red snapper, which I really like – and it was indeed delicious!

IMG_1498

But what I probably like the most was a Chinese (namely Hokkien and Teochew) fried snack called mini ngo hiang – that was spicy minced chicken meat wrapped in very thin beancurd skin.

IMG_1493

In the next photo there are two Malaysian dishes: nasi lemak on the left and curry laksa on the right. The former, consisting of coconut rice, chicken curry, anchovies sambal (a type of sauce), hard-boiled eggs, cucumbers and achar (pickled vegetables), was very nice. The latter – basically a curry noodle soup with prawns, chicken and tau pok (deep-fried tofu) – was pretty decent too, but started to cloy quite quickly.

IMG_1491

Another dish that was either Indonesian or Malay was beef rendang, made from meat chunks stewed in coconut milk and some spices.

IMG_1499

And here is a rather interesting drink called Grandson’s Favourite, made with almond soy milk, grass jelly and palm sugar.

IMG_1492

The next day, if you remember, we were exploring Chinatown; therefore, we had lunch right there, in a Chinese restaurant, of course. It wasn’t entirely clear how the restaurant was called, but Google now suggests that it’s Chinatown Shanghai Kitchen. We ordered a hell lot of food, and it was all excellent.

IMG_1575

Here is the good old sweet and sour pork, which is popular throughout the world and, by the way, as far as I know, belongs to Cantonese rather than Shanghainese cuisine:

???????????????????????????????

This is some quite ordinary roast duck, not the famous Peking one, and not even the slightly less well-known Cantonese one, but nevertheless very tender and tasty.

IMG_1568

And this one is sizzling beef with ginger and onion, also very tender and spicy:

IMG_1562

Chili crab is yet another must-try Singaporean dish, along with laksa and nasi lemak, that we had the day before. It tasted pretty good, although not particularly to die for, was moderately spicy, and very messy to eat: no matter how hard you try to keep it neat, you’ll still end up eating with your hands and getting yourself all dirty.

IMG_1573

In addition to all this meaty-fishy food, we also got a variety of side dishes, such as these noodles with vegetables and some spongy mushrooms, which looked more like pieces of bread:

IMG_1572

Or this asparagus with snow peas and bean sprouts:

IMG_1561

This is sautéed kai-lan, or Chinese broccoli, except that it doesn’t look much like the broccoli we’re used to. I’d never heard of this vegetable previously, but during this Asian trip it definitely became one of my favourite.

IMG_1563

And one more side dish – sautéed Chinese vegetables (pak choi and some mushrooms).

IMG_1570

Later the same day, we discovered the huge food court of the Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands mall, where we were hiding from a heavy downpour. My companions decided to go for tea and cake only, while I, not being a big fan of the latter, opted for a proper meal. After a long indecisive walk along the various food booths, I stopped at the Korean one and got a BBQ set consisting of a seaweed soup, spicy BBQ chicken, rice, fried dried anchovies and cabbage kimchi (that is spicy pickled cabbage). Honestly, I wasn’t wild with delight – whether because I wasn’t too hungry or simply this combination of flavours was not my thing.

IMG_1684

???????????????????????????????

Other booths, as I already mentioned in this post, offered a huge variety of cuisines, mainly Asian ones – this one had Singapore’s local delicacies:

IMG_1671

Yong Tau Foo is a Chinese Hakka dish, which originally used to be a soup with tofu stuffed with meat or fish (hence the name), and now can contain lots of various other stuff like meat or fish balls, seafood, vegetables, crab sticks, mushrooms, and in fact doesn’t even have to be a soup, it can be eaten as a dry dish as well.

IMG_1672

Bak kut teh is a Chinese soup made of pork ribs with various additional ingredients; the name literally means “meat bone tea”. Despite the fact that the dish is of Chinese origin, it is mostly common in Malaysia and Singapore, where it was brought in the 19th century by Chinese workers of Hokkien and Teochew origins.

IMG_1673

As far as I understand, Chinatown Beef Noodle is a chain, serving, obviously, different sorts and varieties of beef noodles.

IMG_1674

One of the elements of Cantonese cuisine is the rotisserie style called siu mei, which includes different meats (pork, chicken, goose, duck) and is very popular in Hong Kong.

IMG_1675

Here you can get Singapore-style fried noodles with various ingredients.

IMG_1677

Nasi Padang is basically steamed rice served with all kinds of meat and vegetable dishes, comes from the city of Padang in Indonesia.

IMG_1678

Ajisen Ramen is a Japanese fast-food chain, serving, as the name implies, different kinds of ramen soup (wheat noodles in broth, with all sorts of toppings).

IMG_1679

Jia Xiang Sarawak Kuching Kolo Mee is yet another chain that specialises in Kolo Mee (a dish of egg noodles with pork, originating from the Sarawak state in Malaysia).

IMG_1680

Continuing the topic of noodle soups, another variation thereof is ban mian, a dish common in Hokkien- and Hakka-speaking areas (in particular, the Fujian province in China, Singapore and Malaysia).

IMG_1681

This looks like the Malay cuisine booth, although I wasn’t able to identify any of the dishes on the signboards.

IMG_1682

The Indian cuisine booth:

IMG_1683

I believe everyone is familiar with the concept of dim sum, as this invention of Cantonese cuisine is widespread worldwide. For those who are not – these are light snacks, served in small plates or bamboo steamers. There exists a great variety of dim sum choices: all sorts of dumplings you can even think of, buns with various fillings, fried chicken legs (the so-called “phoenix claws”), pork ribs, meatballs, even congee, and many, many more.

IMG_1685

Judging by the dishes represented here, this booth also serves dim sum, and not only shrimp dumplings, as the name suggests, but also other kinds of dumplings, as well as the aforementioned chicken legs, egg custard buns, etc.

IMG_1686

And here is Japanese food and, as seen in the picture, many of the dishes are served in traditional bento boxes with multiple compartments.

IMG_1687

More noodles – and they are prepared right here, before your very eyes.

IMG_1688

Philippine cuisine is the least known to me out of all the mentioned above, I would have loved to try it, but didn’t have the opportunity this time.

IMG_1689

The next day I felt the urgent desire to have some Chinese dumplings, so half of us headed to Din Tai Fung, a Taiwanese chain restaurant specializing in xiaolongbao (steamed dumplings).

IMG_7563

As it is often the case in dim sum and dumpling restaurants, you are handed the menu with a pen, and you can mark off what you want and in what quantities.

IMG_1748

Tea and shredded ginger are served immediately and free of charge.

IMG_1749

IMG_1752

We ordered vegetable and pork wonton soup (wontons are a variety of dumplings, wrapped in very thin dough), some rice and my favourite kai-lan, stir-fried Hong Kong-style, with special oyster sauce.

IMG_1753

And then came the dumplings. Minimum portion was 6 pieces, so even though we wanted to try as much as possible, due to the lack of spare stomachs, we had to limit ourselves to two types only. These are chicken dumplings:

IMG_1755

And these are shrimp and pork dumplings, called shao mai (or siu mai in Cantonese pronunciation – and that is how they are best known, due to the already mentioned worldwide popularity of dim sum).

IMG_1754

The next day, we found this eatery on the Sentosa Island:

IMG_7578

The place is pretty small, and the menu, although not extremely abundant, is somehow very diverse in terms of the number of cuisines represented.

IMG_1775

So our selection was quite diverse as well – we, already missing familiar food, started with a mushroom soup and a plain vegetable salad.

IMG_1777

Indian dum biryani is a dish of rice with meat (in this case – chicken) and/or vegetables and spices, a spicy one, as one would expect from Indian cuisine, though in moderation.

IMG_1778

Gong bao chicken is also spicy, and, as one would expect from Szechuan cuisine, not in moderation. Szechuan cuisine is generally characterised by extensive use of pepper – in particular, the combination of dried chili with Szechuan peppercorn (which in fact is not quite pepper, but rather husks of the zanthoxylum plant) creates that sensation of numbing heat, which is a distinguishing feature of this cuisine.

IMG_1780

Another meal we had on Sentosa Island was in Hollywood China Bistro in Universal Studios amusement park.

IMG_1912

IMG_1910

This time we weren’t really up for new exotic dishes so we ordered the familiar stuff. For example, sweet corn soup with egg:

IMG_1905

Here is quite an ordinary dish with a not-so-ordinary name: braised ee fu noodles with mushrooms. Ee fu, also known as yi mein is a Cantonese egg noodles variety made from wheat flour.

IMG_1907

Lemon chicken is quite a famous dish, served more often in Chinese restaurants around the world, than in China itself.

IMG_1908

And this is Cantonese roast duck, with a fragrant sauce – one type of siu mei, which I mentioned above.

IMG_1904

All of this was accompanied by wonderful jasmine tea.

IMG_1900

If you remember, we were spending the first half of the next day at the Singapore Botanic Gardens, therefore, we had lunch right in the Ginger Garden, at the Halia restaurant, whose name actually means “ginger” in Malay. From noon to 2pm they serve a set menu of two or three courses to choose from. The portions are quite small, but delicious and generously seasoned with ginger, just as one might expect.

IMG_7740

Here’s what their starters are like (out of those we tried): these are pieces of home-cured salmon, cucumber and kipfler potato with some rye croutons and English mustard:

IMG_2010

And this is a salad of heirloom tomato, watermelon and goat cheese with black olives and balsamic vinegar.

IMG_2011

The soup of the day was pumpkin soup:

IMG_2012

And then, the main courses arrived: grilled fillet of barramundi fish with local organic mushrooms and Chinese roast duck consommé. The waiter pours the consommé into the bowl from a small pitcher, right at the table.

IMG_2013

One more main – roasted corn fed chicken breast with carrot puree, potato mille-feuille and Brussels sprouts.

IMG_2014

Quite unexpectedly, I really loved the desserts, perhaps even more than the starters and mains. The ginger nougat parfait with caramelised pineapple and spiced pineapple sauce was simply amazing!

IMG_2015

And this is coconut panna cotta with mango, passion fruit, mint and lychee granita.

IMG_2016

But that wasn’t it for our gastronomic adventures that day. After lunch we headed to the Gardens by the Bay, where we stayed right until dinner. The dinner, which we had nearby, at the Majestic Bay seafood restaurant, turned out great. Right near the entrance there stood a few big tanks with live seafood.

IMG_7788

IMG_2066

IMG_2065

IMG_2064

IMG_2063

IMG_2052

We went for the set menu consisting of small portions of several courses, so as to try more different food. The first thing to be served was the snack combo: soft shell crab with lemon buttermilk sauce, some kind of crisps and Japanese scallops with pickled cucumber, grapes and Kyoto dressing.

IMG_2053

The next course was chicken soup with cordyceps (at that time we had no idea what it was, thank goodness – but having googled it later I discovered that it was parasitic fungi!), con poy (dried scallops) and Chinese ham. The soup tasted quite unusually.

IMG_2054

Then came wok-fried pork ribs with espresso sauce – yummy!

IMG_2056

It was followed by stewed 10 heads abalone (familiar to us from our last Hong Kong trip), with tofu and my old friend kai-lan. Generally, abalone tastes quite nice, although I wouldn’t include it among my favourite food.

IMG_2057

Next we had some stewed Boston lobster with bee hoon (South-East Asian rice noodles). The lobster was very good, but for some reason I didn’t enjoy the noodles much.

IMG_2058

And last, but not least, we were served the dessert: essence of mango puree in a whole young coconut (i. e. with soft meat) and a glutinous rice dumpling with fresh cream stuffing. Both were delicious.

IMG_2061

And finally, we had our last meal in Singapore right at the airport, before the flight to Hong Kong, in the Peach Garden Noodle House.

IMG_2081

First of all, I ordered my long-time favourite Szechuan-style hot and sour soup.

IMG_2085

The main course was noodles with roast pork, and broth served separately. The broth had to be poured onto the noodles to turn them into a soup, which I didn’t do – that would be way too many soups for me.

IMG_2089

Hainanese chicken rice is one more dish, considered Singapore’s national (even though it derived, of course, from the cuisine of the Hainan island in China). This dish is served with chicken broth, pounded ginger, dark soy sauce and chili garlic sauce. Overall, it wasn’t bad, but a bit too greasy for my taste.

???????????????????????????????

Advertisements

Еда в Сингапуре (бонусный пост)

CLICK HERE FOR ENGLISH VERSION. АНГЛОЯЗЫЧНАЯ ВЕРСИЯ ПО ЭТОЙ ССЫЛКЕ.

Если вы читали предыдущие посты про Сингапур, то, возможно, помните, что я грозилась сделать отдельную гастрономическую заметку, в которой будет описано все, что я во время поездки ела (и даже то, что сама не ела, а лишь видела со стороны). Любители поесть, к каковым причисляю и себя, надеюсь, оценят.

Итак, в день нашего приезда в Сингапур, мы оказались в торговом центре Paragon, где, как и практически везде тут, наличествовал обширный фуд корт. Нам показалось логичным начать знакомство с едой в Сингапуре собственно с ресторана сингапурской кухни. Таковой имелся – ресторан Grandma’s с гордостью возвещал о своей аутентичности.

IMG_1501

Сингапурская кухня представлена огромным количеством блюд различного происхождения, что совершенно не удивительно при столь разнообразном этническом составе населения. Само понятие «сингапурская кухня» – это эдакий микс кухонь китайской и малайской/индонезийской, с элементами других азиатских и даже европейских кухонь.

Жареного красного снэппера (он же луциан, он же рифовый окунь) я заказала в первую очередь – очень уж люблю эту рыбу, и не прогадала, вкусно!

IMG_1498

Но пожалуй, больше всего понравилась китайская (из фуцзяньской и чаошаньской кухни) жареная закуска под названием мини нго хианг – это пряная рубленая курица, завернутая в тонкую пленку с соевого молока.

IMG_1493

На следующем фото – два малайских блюда: наси лемак слева и карри лакса справа. Первое, состоящее из риса, сваренного в кокосовом молоке, куриного карри, анчоусового самбала (приправы), яиц вкрутую, огурцов и ачара (маринованных овощей), очень понравилось. Второе – суп-лапша с креветками, курицей, тофу и собственно карри – вроде как и неплохое, но довольно быстро надоело.

IMG_1491

Еще одно блюдо, то ли индонезийское, то ли малайское – ренданг из говядины, представляющий собой кусочки мяса, тушенные в кокосовом молоке и каких-то специях.

IMG_1499

А вот достаточно интересный напиток, называется Grandson’s Favourite – из миндально-соевого молока и травяного желе, с пальмовым сахаром.

IMG_1492

На следующий день, если помните, днем мы рассекали по Чайнатауну, соответственно, в оном и обедали, и, конечно же, именно в китайском ресторане. Не совсем понятно, как именно этот ресторан называется, вот гугл подсказывает, что Chinatown Shanghai Kitchen. Еды заказали много, и она была прекрасна.

IMG_1575

Вот старая добрая свинина в кисло-сладком соусе, которая популярна во всем мире и, кстати, насколько мне известно, скорее относится к кантонской кухне, нежели шанхайской:

???????????????????????????????

Это самая обыкновенная жареная утка, а вовсе не всем известная пекинская, и даже не чуть менее известная кантонская, но в любом случае мягкая и вкусная.

IMG_1568

А вот говядина с имбирем и луком, очень нежная и пряная:

IMG_1562

Чили краб – это еще одно блюдо сингапурской кухни, обязательное к дегустации, наряду с лаксой и наси лемак, отведанными нами накануне. На вкус – достаточно неплохо, правда, не скажу, что прямо умереть – не встать, в меру остро, не очень удобно есть: как ни изощряйся, в результате все равно придется есть руками и перепачкаться соусом.

IMG_1573

Ну, и помимо мясных блюд, мы также взяли разнообразные гарниры, например, лапшу с овощами и какими-то ноздреватыми грибами, которые скорее похожи на куски хлеба.

IMG_1572

Или вот спаржа с бобовыми ростками:

IMG_1561

А вот – жареный гай лань, он же – китайская брокколи, разве что, на привычную нам брокколи не слишком-то и похож. Я никогда раньше об этом овоще не слышала, но после этой азиатской поездки записала его в число любимых.

IMG_1563

И еще один гарнир – жареные китайские овощи (пак чой и какие-то грибы).

IMG_1570

Вечером того же дня мы оказались в фуд корте торгового центра Marina Bay, причем не по собственной воле, а скрываясь от сильнейшего ливня. Мои спутники решили ограничиться лишь чаем с пирожными, я же, не будучи большим любителем последних, решила поужинать по-человечески. После долгого хождения мимо будок фуд корта, остановилась у корейской и взяла себе набор, состоящий из супа из водорослей , острого куриного барбекю, риса, жареных сушеных анчоусов и кимчхи из капусты (то бишь острой квашеной капусты). Честно скажу, дикого восторга я не испытала – то ли была не слишком голодна, то ли просто это сочетание вкусов не по мне.

IMG_1684

???????????????????????????????

Другие будки, как я уже писала в этом посте, предлагают огромное разнообразие блюд различных кухонь, преимущественно азиатских – вот местные сингапурские лакомства:

IMG_1671

Йонг тау фу – блюдо китайской кухни хакка, изначально представляло собой суп с кусочками тофу, фаршированного мясом или рыбой (откуда и название), а теперь – еще и со всякой всячиной вроде мясных или рыбных шариков, морепродуктов, овощей, крабовых палочек, грибов, а кроме того, все это великолепие не обязательно должно быть супом, есть разновидность и в качестве второго блюда.

IMG_1672

Бак кут те – это китайский суп из свиных ребрышек с различными добавками, название буквально означает «чай из мясных костей». Несмотря на то, что блюдо имеет китайское происхождение, встречается оно чаще всего именно в Сингапуре и Малайзии, куда его завезли в 19 веке китайские рабочие фуцзяньского и чаошаньского происхождения.

IMG_1673

Насколько я понимаю, Chinatown Beef Noodle – это такая сеть, подается там, соответственно, лапша с говядиной во всевозможных вариантах.

IMG_1674

Одно из направлений кантонской кухни, очень популярное в Гонконге – это сиу мей, или жареное на открытом огне мясо (свинина, курица, гусь, утка).

IMG_1675

А это – жареная лапша по-сингапурски, с разнообразными добавками.

IMG_1677

Наси паданг – это вареный на пару рис со всевозможными мясными и овощными добавками, происходит из города Паданг в Индонезии.

IMG_1678

Ajisen Ramen – японская сеть фаст-фуда, подаются тут, как понятно из названия, различные виды супа рамэн (пшеничная лапша в бульоне, со всевозможными добавками).

IMG_1679

Jia Xiang Sarawak Kuching Kolo Mee – еще одна сеть, специализирующаяся на коло мее (блюде из яичной лапши со свининой, родом из малайского штата Саравак).

IMG_1680

Продолжим тему супа-лапши: еще одна вариация оного – это бань мянь, распространено это блюдо в местах обитания носителей фуцзяньского диалекта китайского языка и диалекта хакка (в частности, в самой провинции Фуцзянь, Сингапуре и Малайзии).

IMG_1681

Вроде как будка малайской кухни, хотя ни одно из приведенных на вывесках блюд мне идентифицировать не удалось.

IMG_1682

Уголок индийской кухни:

IMG_1683

С понятием «дим сам», думаю, знакомы все, ибо это изобретение кантонской кухни широко распространено по всему миру. Для тех, кто в танке – это такие легкие закуски, подаваемые на маленьких тарелочках или в бамбуковых пароварках. Видов дим сам великое множество: это и самые разнообразные пельмени, и булочки с различными начинками, и жареные куриные лапы (т.н. «когти феникса»), и ребрышки, и мясные шарики, и даже рисовая каша, и много чего другого.

IMG_1685

Судя по представленным блюдам, здесь тоже дим сам, причем не только пельмени с креветками, как утверждает название, но и другие виды пельменей, а также все те же куриные лапы, булочки с яичным кремом, и т.д.

IMG_1686

А вот японская еда, и как видно на картинке, многие из блюд подаются в порционных коробочках с несколькими отделениями – традиционных бэнто.

IMG_1687

Еще лапша – вот прямо тут, у всех на глазах, ее и делают.

IMG_1688

Из всего вышеперечисленного наименее известной мне является филиппинская кухня, с удовольствием бы попробовала, но к сожалению, в этот раз не получилось.

IMG_1689

На следующий день шибко захотелось китайских пельменей, поэтому мы усеченным составом направились в ресторан Din Tai Fung из тайваньской сети, как раз специализирующийся на мантах на пару – сяолунбао.

IMG_7563

Как оно нередко бывает в пельменных и димсамовых ресторанах, к меню прилагается ручка, и ты сам отмечаешь, что и в каком количестве хочешь заказать.

IMG_1748

Чай и имбирная стружка подаются сразу и бесплатно.

IMG_1749

IMG_1752

Мы в результате взяли суп с вонтонами (разновидность пельменей из тонкого теста) с овощами и свининой, рис и уже так полюбившийся мне гай лань, приготовленный по-гонконгски, со специальным устричным соусом.

IMG_1753

Ну и, собственно, сами пельмешки сяолунбао. Минимальная порция – 6 штук, поэтому хотя и хотелось попробовать всего побольше, ввиду отсутствия запасного желудка, пришлось ограничиться всего двумя видами. Это пельмени с курицей:

IMG_1755

А это – пельмени со свининой и креветками, называемые шао май (в кантонском произношении «сиу май» – именно в таком варианте они наиболее известны, ввиду уже упомянутой мной выше повсеместной распространенности дим сам).

IMG_1754

На следующий день, на острове Сентоса, мы забрели вот в такую азиатскую едальню:

IMG_7578

Заведение довольно маленькое, а меню, хоть и не изобилует количеством наименований, умудряется быть настолько разнообразным по числу представленных кухонь, что прямо глаза разбежались.

IMG_1775

Вот мы и заказали относительно разнообразно – начали с грибного супа и обычного овощного салата, соскучившись по привычной еде.

IMG_1777

Индийское дум бирьяни – это блюдо из риса с мясом (в данном случае – курицей) и/или овощами и специями, острое, как и полагается в индийской кухне, правда в меру.

IMG_1778

Курица «гунбао» тоже острая, причем, как и полагается в сычуаньской кухне, не в меру. Сычуаньской кухне вообще присуще использование большого количества перца – в частности, сочетание сушеного перца чили с сычуаньским перцем (который на самом деле вовсе даже не перец, а плод перечного дерева, или зантоксилума) дает ту самую, характерную для этой кухни, сухую остроту, вызывающую онемение полости рта и острое послевкусие.

IMG_1780

На той же Сентосе, в парке аттракционов Юниверсал Студиос, мы питались еще раз, в китайском ресторане Hollywood China Bistro.

IMG_1912

IMG_1910

В этот раз особо изощряться не стали, а взяли хорошо знакомые блюда. В частности, суп из сладкой кукурузы с яйцом:

IMG_1905

А вот вполне обычное блюдо, с не таким уж обычным названием: лапша и-фу с грибами. И-фу, она же и-мейн – это кантонская яичная лапша из пшеничной муки.

IMG_1907

Лимонная курица – достаточно известное блюдо, подаваемое в китайских ресторанах по всему миру, причем реже всего в самом Китае.

IMG_1908

А это – жареная утка по-кантонски, под ароматным соусом, разновидность уже упомянутого мной выше жаркого сиу мей.

IMG_1904

Ну и сдобрено все это было замечательным жасминовым чаем.

IMG_1900

Первую половину следующего дня, если помните, мы проводили в Ботанических садах, соответственно, и обедали там же – в Имбирном саду, в ресторане Halia, название которого как раз-таки и означает «имбирь» по-малайски. С 12 до 2 часов дня у них подают комплексный обед из двух или трех блюд, на выбор. Порции довольно маленькие, но все вкусно и щедро приправлено, как и следует ожидать, имбирем.

IMG_7740

Вот какие у них закуски (из попробованных нами) – это кусочки копченого лосося, огурца, картофеля кипфлер (это такой деликатесный салатный сорт) с какими-то сухарями и английской горчицей:

IMG_2010

А это салат из арбуза, помидоров трех цветов и козьего сыра, с маслинами и бальзамическим уксусом.

IMG_2011

Суп дня – тыквенный:

IMG_2012

Из основных блюд: рыба баррамунди на гриле (она же – белый морской окунь) с местными грибами и консоме из жареной утки по-китайски. Консоме подливают в тарелку прямо на месте, из небольшого чайничка.

IMG_2013

А также – жареная куриная грудка с морковным пюре, картофельным мильфеем (это по сути такая многослойная картофельная запеканка) и брюссельской капустой.

IMG_2014

Против обыкновения, мне очень понравились десерты, пожалуй даже больше, чем закуски и вторые блюда. Имбирное парфе-нуга (холодный десерт) с карамелизированными ананасами и в пряном ананасном соусе – это было просто прекрасно!

IMG_2015

Это кокосовая панна котта с манго и маракуйей и колотым льдом из сока личи.

IMG_2016

Но этим наши гастрономические похождения в тот день не ограничились. После обеда мы направились в сады на Marina Bay, где и прогуляли до самого ужина. Ели прямо рядом же, в морепродуктовом ресторане Majestic Bay, причем ужин получился прекрасный. Морепродукты свежайшие, их вылавливают из аквариумов прямо тут же.

IMG_7788

IMG_2066

IMG_2065

IMG_2064

IMG_2063

IMG_2052

Мы заказали набор, состоящий из маленький порций нескольких блюд, дабы попробовать всего побольше. Сначала принесли закуски: мягкопанцирного краба с соусом из пахты с лимоном, что-то хрустящее (не удалось понять, что именно) и японские морские гребешки с маринованным огурцом и виноградом.

IMG_2053

Следующим номером шел суп – куриный, с кордицепсом (на тот момент мы понятия не имели, что это такое, и слава богу – ибо погуглив впоследствии, выяснили, что это грибы, паразитирующие на насекомых!), сушеными гребешками и китайской ветчиной. Вкус у супа довольно оригинальный.

IMG_2054

Дальше шли жареные свиные ребрышки в кофейном соусе – вкусно!

IMG_2056

Следующее блюдо – тушеное морское ушко (оно же абалон, известный нам еще по прошлой поездке в Гонконг), с тофу и нашим старым знакомым гай ланем. В целом, вкусный моллюск, хотя в число любимых блюд бы его не включила.

IMG_2057

Далее – тушеный омар с юговосточноазиатской рисовой вермишелью би-хун. Сам омар был весьма недурственен, а вот лапша как-то не пошла.

IMG_2058

Ну и в конце, ясное дело, подали десерт: пюре из манго в молодом кокосе (то есть, с мягкой мякотью, пардон за плеоназм) и рисовый пирожок со сметанной начинкой. И то, и другое очень даже порадовало.

IMG_2061

Ну и последний наш обед в Сингапуре был прямо в аэропорту, перед рейсом в Гонконг, в ресторане лапши с поэтическим названием Peach Garden (то бишь «Персиковый сад»).

IMG_2081

На первое был давно любимый мной сычуаньский остро-кислый суп.

IMG_2085

Далее – лапша с жареной свининой, и бульон отдельно к ней. Бульоном надо было эту самую лапшу полить, чтоб получился суп, чего мы, честно говоря, не сделали – уж слишком много супов получается.

IMG_2089

Хайнаньская курица с рисом – еще одно блюдо, считающееся национальным сингапурским (хотя и происходит, понятное дело, из кухни китайского острова Хайнань). Подается это блюдо с куриным бульоном, толченым имбирем, темным соевым соусом и чесночным соусом чили. В целом, неплохо, но на мой вкус слишком жирно.

???????????????????????????????

Post Navigation